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  1. <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
  2. <!DOCTYPE xep SYSTEM 'xep.dtd' [
  3. <!ENTITY % ents SYSTEM 'xep.ent'>
  4. %ents;
  5. ]>
  6. <?xml-stylesheet type='text/xsl' href='xep.xsl'?>
  7. <xep>
  8. <header>
  9. <title>User Profile</title>
  10. <abstract>This document specifies how to represent and manage profile data about IM users and other XMPP entities using the XMPP Data Forms extension.</abstract>
  11. &LEGALNOTICE;
  12. <number>0154</number>
  13. <status>Deferred</status>
  14. <type>Standards Track</type>
  15. <sig>Standards</sig>
  16. <approver>Council</approver>
  17. <dependencies>
  18. <spec>XMPP Core</spec>
  19. <spec>XEP-0004</spec>
  20. <spec>XEP-0060</spec>
  21. <spec>XEP-0068</spec>
  22. <spec>XEP-0163</spec>
  23. </dependencies>
  24. <supersedes>
  25. <spec>XEP-0054</spec>
  26. </supersedes>
  27. <supersededby/>
  28. <shortname>TO-BE-ASSIGNED</shortname>
  29. &stpeter;
  30. <revision>
  31. <version>0.6</version>
  32. <date>2008-04-18</date>
  33. <initials>psa</initials>
  34. <remark><p>Updated to reflect stable PEP protocol; added OpenID field; specified XML schema; changed namespace to conform to XMPP Registrar procedures.</p></remark>
  35. </revision>
  36. <revision>
  37. <version>0.5</version>
  38. <date>2006-08-02</date>
  39. <initials>psa</initials>
  40. <remark><p>Updated to reflect changes to XEP-0163; added some mappings to the eduPerson object class.</p></remark>
  41. </revision>
  42. <revision>
  43. <version>0.4</version>
  44. <date>2006-01-16</date>
  45. <initials>psa</initials>
  46. <remark><p>Defined data management methods using IQ and the PEP subset of pubsub; added various data fields from LDAP; changed namespace from profiledata to profile.</p></remark>
  47. </revision>
  48. <revision>
  49. <version>0.3</version>
  50. <date>2005-11-11</date>
  51. <initials>psa</initials>
  52. <remark><p>Added postaladdress, fav_chatrooms, alt_contact, teams; added various security-related fields.</p></remark>
  53. </revision>
  54. <revision>
  55. <version>0.2</version>
  56. <date>2005-07-25</date>
  57. <initials>psa</initials>
  58. <remark><p>Added mappings to common LDAP schemas.</p></remark>
  59. </revision>
  60. <revision>
  61. <version>0.1</version>
  62. <date>2005-06-16</date>
  63. <initials>psa</initials>
  64. <remark><p>Initial version.</p></remark>
  65. </revision>
  66. <revision>
  67. <version>0.0.5</version>
  68. <date>2005-06-13</date>
  69. <initials>psa</initials>
  70. <remark><p>Defined how to handle vCard types such as home vs. work addresses.</p></remark>
  71. </revision>
  72. <revision>
  73. <version>0.0.4</version>
  74. <date>2005-04-07</date>
  75. <initials>psa</initials>
  76. <remark><p>Reworked field standardization; added support for telephony addresses, electronic addresses, and organizational data.</p></remark>
  77. </revision>
  78. <revision>
  79. <version>0.0.3</version>
  80. <date>2005-03-11</date>
  81. <initials>psa</initials>
  82. <remark><p>Added open issues.</p></remark>
  83. </revision>
  84. <revision>
  85. <version>0.0.2</version>
  86. <date>2005-01-06</date>
  87. <initials>psa</initials>
  88. <remark><p>Explained requirements and design decisions in more detail, especially with regard to extensibility; split photo into two elements (data and URL).</p></remark>
  89. </revision>
  90. <revision>
  91. <version>0.0.1</version>
  92. <date>2004-11-10</date>
  93. <initials>psa</initials>
  94. <remark><p>First draft.</p></remark>
  95. </revision>
  96. </header>
  97. <section1 topic='Introduction' anchor='intro'>
  98. <p>It is widely acknowledged within the Jabber/XMPP community that the &xep0054; specification (<cite>XEP-0054</cite>) has outlived its usefulness. There are several reasons for this conclusion:</p>
  99. <ol>
  100. <li><cite>XEP-0054</cite> is not fully consistent with the Internet-Draft on which it was based.</li>
  101. <li>The Internet-Draft on which it was based was never approved by the IETF.</li>
  102. <li>Because of confusion over aspects of the vcard-temp specification, there exist incompatible implementations.</li>
  103. <li>vCard (&rfc2426;) captures only a limited set of information.</li>
  104. <li>vCard (even in its XML representation <note>For links to the experimental XML representation of vCard, see <cite>XEP-0054</cite>.</note>) is not easily extensible, leading those who develop profiles for specialized communities to "roll their own" protocols, to the detriment of interoperability.</li>
  105. <li>vCard data tends to be monolithic (the basic unit of information is the full vCard, not parts thereof).</li>
  106. <li>The publication model for XEP-0054 is to set the full vCard, rather than only the parts that need to be modified.</li>
  107. <li>The retrieval model for XEP-0054 is to get the full vCard, rather than only the parts that have been modified.</li>
  108. </ol>
  109. <p>Given the weaknesses of vCard, there is interest across the broader Internet community in replacing vCard with something more modern and extensible. Unfortunately, no other standards development organization has developed an alternative to vCard. Part of the challenge is that quite detailed ontologies have been developed that might replace parts of the vCard specification (e.g., the <cite>Extensible Name and Address Language</cite> <note>See &lt;<link url='http://xml.coverpages.org/xnal.html'>http://xml.coverpages.org/xnal.html</link>&gt;.</note> developed by &OASIS;) while less-formal ontologies are being used to represent other parts of the problem space (e.g., &foaf;). The relevant protocols are in flux and it is unclear when (or even if) stability will emerge.</p>
  110. <p>Because of the unsettled landspace and the strong desire within the Jabber/XMPP community to move beyond XEP-0054, this document specifies methods for the representation of profile data in terms of the &xep0004; protocol (further qualified using the standardization concepts specified in &xep0068;) and for the management of profile data using standard IQ request-response semantics as well as, for more frequently-modified data, &xep0060; semantics (specifically the simplified subset of those semantics specified in &xep0163;). The rationale behind these design decisions is provided below.</p>
  111. </section1>
  112. <section1 topic='Requirements' anchor='reqs'>
  113. <p>This document addresses the following requirements for data management:</p>
  114. <ol>
  115. <li>Enable an entity to publish profile data about itself.</li>
  116. <li>Enable requesting entities to retrieve profile data about other entities.</li>
  117. </ol>
  118. <p>This document addresses the following requirements for data representation:</p>
  119. <ol>
  120. <li>Specify how to represent profile data in an XMPP-friendly manner for communication over the wire.</li>
  121. <li>Ensure that the protocol is extensible (e.g., not limited to existing vCard fields).
  122. <note>The extensibility requirement is critically important, because it would be best if the protocol specified herein could be used to represent data used within specialized communities. Examples of such communities include dating services, multiplayer gaming networks, IM services provided by portals and ISPs, and expert-location systems within large corporations. While such communities might use part or all of some common set of data fields (such as fields that map to familiar vCard elements), each community might also want to represent quite disparate kinds of information (dating criteria, favorite games, contact preferences, areas of expertise, and the like). Furthermore, data might be used to profile network actors that are not persons (e.g., bots, services, and other software agents). Therefore, the ideal proposal will provide an extensible framework for representing profile data and will not limit itself to representing the relatively small set of data fields covered by the vCard format.</note>
  123. </li>
  124. <li>Where possible, map profile data fields to existing vCard fields and other common formats.</li>
  125. </ol>
  126. </section1>
  127. <section1 topic='Concepts and Approach' anchor='approach'>
  128. <section2 topic='Data Management' anchor='approach-management'>
  129. <p>There are several possible approaches to representing profile data for communication over XMPP networks, including the following:</p>
  130. <ol>
  131. <li>
  132. <p><strong>IQ (request-and-response) semantics.</strong></p>
  133. <p>In the simplest case, an entity may store its own profile data and provide only the complete profile and only on request, using the request-response semantics of the XMPP &IQ; stanza type. This model is most appropriate for stable entities that are always online and whose profile data does not change frequently, such as servers and server-side components (entities that are not always online or that frequently modify their profile data, such as IM users, may prefer to publish their information to entities that are always online, such as an IM user's server). While it may seem desirable to embed profile data in the responses an entity provides to service discovery information requests using &xep0128;, it is likely that profile data will be quite extensive; therefore, we define a standalone "wrapper" element for profile data, qualified by the 'urn:xmpp:tmp:profile' namespace &NSNOTE;.</p>
  134. </li>
  135. <li>
  136. <p><strong>Pubsub (publish-and-subscribe) semantics.</strong></p>
  137. <p>A more complex model is for an entity to publish its profile data to a publish-subscribe node or nodes and allow other entities to subscribe to that node or nodes, thus receiving notifications whenever the profiled entity updates its data. This model is more appropriate for entities that modify their profile data on a regular basis or when other entities wish to be informed when the profile data changes. Because this model will most likely be used most often by IM users and other intermittently-connected network endpoints, we use the simplified subset of the XMPP publish-subscribe extension defined in <cite>XEP-0163</cite> to implement this model.</p>
  138. </li>
  139. </ol>
  140. </section2>
  141. <section2 topic='Data Representation' anchor='approach-representation'>
  142. <p>As with data management, there are several possible approaches to representing profile data for communication over XMPP networks, including the following:</p>
  143. <ul>
  144. <li>
  145. <p><strong>Structured data formats, such as &xep0080; and &xep0112;.</strong></p>
  146. <p>Such data formats have the advantage of being human-readable. However:</p>
  147. <ol>
  148. <li>They are not easily extensible: developers of specialized community services would need to write their own structured data formats, even to add one new field.</li>
  149. <li>They are not easy to map to backend data storage facilities (e.g., database administrators generally would prefer to have generic database schemas and re-usable code for parsing the XML wire protocol into the database fields).</li>
  150. <li>They would require specialized interface handlers for each data structure, rather than a generic interface handler.</li>
  151. </ol>
  152. </li>
  153. <li>
  154. <p><strong>A format represented by means of &w3rdf;.</strong></p>
  155. <p>An argument could be made that RDF is a reasonable approach for representing profile data for communication over the XMPP network; however, such an argument will not be made in the current proposal. The author has considered RDF and has concluded that there are several reasons why RDF is undesirable as an XMPP wire protocol:</p>
  156. <ol>
  157. <li>RDF exists in an XML representation but the semantics of RDF impose a more complex conceptual structure (data triples) than does XML; this is sub-optimal since unnecessary complexity is to be avoided (see &xep0134;).</li>
  158. <li>RDF requires a specialized parser rather than the normal XML parser that comes standard with all XMPP implementations.</li>
  159. <li>As long as it is possible to define a consistent mapping of profile data to RDF representations, it should be straightforward to convert the XMPP data formats into those RDF representations if desired (e.g., to output a FOAF file).</li>
  160. </ol>
  161. </li>
  162. <li>
  163. <p><strong>A format represented by means of Data Forms (XEP-0004).</strong></p>
  164. <p>The Data Forms protocol defined in XEP-0004 has several advantages for use over XMPP:</p>
  165. <ol>
  166. <li>It can be parsed using an off-the-shelf XML parser.</li>
  167. <li>It is already widely deployed in existing Jabber/XMPP clients, servers, and components.</li>
  168. <li>The data forms protocol is easily extensible.</li>
  169. <li>The Jabber/XMPP community possesses consistent methods for profiling and scoping data forms (as specified in <cite>XEP-0068</cite>).</li>
  170. <li>Data forms have a generic schema that is easy to map to common data storage mechanisms (usually databases).</li>
  171. <li>Data forms provide a consistent abstraction layer for XMPP applications, thus shielding them from changes in the profile data formats being defined by other Internet projects and standards development organizations.</li>
  172. <li>The use of data forms as the medium of representation for communication over the wire does not prevent applications from storing backend profile data in some other underlying format (e.g., RDF or a database).</li>
  173. </ol>
  174. </li>
  175. </ul>
  176. <p>Therefore, this proposal specifies that profile data shall be represented in data forms scoped by a FORM_TYPE of 'urn:xmpp:tmp:profile' &NSNOTE;, in accordance with the field standardization methods defined in <cite>XEP-0068</cite>. For the sake of interoperability, profile data fields that will be in common use SHOULD be registered with the &REGISTRAR; (although they may or may not be defined in a XMPP Extension Protocol specification). Profile data fields that are intended to be used only within the context of a specialized application MAY remain unregistered, but unregistered fields MUST begin with the string "x-" in accordance with Section 3.4 of <cite>XEP-0068</cite>. <note>Alternatively, specialized applications MAY define separate FORM_TYPEs for their particular data elements.</note></p>
  177. <p>The following is a simple and incomplete example of profile data represented via the Data Forms protocol, containing two registered data fields and one unregistered field:</p>
  178. <example caption='A Basic Example'><![CDATA[
  179. <profile xmlns='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'>
  180. <x xmlns='jabber:x:data' type='result'>
  181. <field var='FORM_TYPE' type='hidden'>
  182. <value>urn:xmpp:tmp:profile</value>
  183. </field>
  184. <field var='common_name'>
  185. <value>Peter Saint-Andre</value>
  186. </field>
  187. <field var='nickname'>
  188. <value>stpeter</value>
  189. </field>
  190. <field var='x-favorite_painters'>
  191. <value>Joaquin Sorolla</value>
  192. <value>Jan Vermeer</value>
  193. </field>
  194. </x>
  195. </profile>
  196. ]]></example>
  197. <p>By specifying that all fields are scoped by a FORM_TYPE of 'urn:xmpp:tmp:profile', this proposal does not mean to imply that all profile data will or should be gathered in one data form. In reality, most such data will probably be gathered at the time of registration either at a website or via a "wizard" interface that breaks the process into smaller bundles (such as "Basic Personal Data", "Physical Location", "Internet Addresses", "Hobbies and Interests", and "Favorite Things"). The use of one FORM_TYPE is simply meant to scope the data fields so that each field is unique within the context of profile data. Any form that uses these fields along with a FORM_TYPE of 'urn:xmpp:tmp:profile' is of the "profile type" (i.e., is a specific instance of that type), which does not limit the number of forms that can be of that type.</p>
  198. <p>However, scoping all data fields with a single FORM_TYPE implies it is necessary to define separate data fields for similar kinds of information. For example, the vCard specification (<cite>RFC 2426</cite>) defines "types" for certains kinds of data, such as email addresses, telephone numbers, and physical addresses, making it possible to specify that a telephone number corresponds to a fax machine or mobile phone or that a physical address corresponds to one's home or work location. In the Data Forms representation, any desired piece of information (e.g., work phone) must be represented with a separate data field.</p>
  199. <p>In order to address most (if not all) of the pieces of information described in existing profile specifications, this document defines a great number of data fields. Even so, the data fields specified herein are not exhaustive, and it is expected that additional fields will be registered in the future through the mechanisms specified in the <link url='#registrar'>XMPP Registrar Considerations</link> section of this document.</p>
  200. </section2>
  201. </section1>
  202. <section1 topic='Producer Use Cases' anchor='producer'>
  203. <section2 topic='Publishing a Full Profile' anchor='producer-full'>
  204. <p>In order to publish a full profile, an entity sends an IQ-set to its server with a child element of &lt;profile/&gt; containing the full profile information.</p>
  205. <example caption='Entity publishes full profile'><![CDATA[
  206. <iq type='set' id='setfull'>
  207. <profile xmlns='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'>
  208. <x xmlns='jabber:x:data' type='submit'>
  209. <field var='FORM_TYPE' type='hidden'>
  210. <value>urn:xmpp:tmp:profile</value>
  211. </field>
  212. <field var='nickname'>
  213. <value>Hamlet</value>
  214. </field>
  215. <field var='country'>
  216. <value>DK</value>
  217. </field>
  218. <field var='locality'>
  219. <value>Elsinore</value>
  220. </field>
  221. <field var='email'>
  222. <value>hamlet@denmark.lit</value>
  223. </field>
  224. </x>
  225. </profile>
  226. </iq>
  227. ]]></example>
  228. <p>If the server can successfully process the request and host the full profile, it MUST return an IQ-result:</p>
  229. <example caption='Server acknowledges success'><![CDATA[
  230. <iq type='result' to='hamlet@denmark.lit/elsinore' id='setfull'/>
  231. ]]></example>
  232. <p>Otherwise it MUST return an error. If the server does not support the profile data functionality, the error MUST be &unavailable;.</p>
  233. </section2>
  234. <section2 topic='Updating One or More Profile Fields' anchor='producer-pub'>
  235. <p>In order to update selected fields in a public profile, an entity simply publishes the modified fields (not the entire profile) to a pubsub node of "urn:xmpp:tmp:profile" at its server using the PEP subset of the publish-subscribe extension, as specified in <cite>XEP-0163</cite>.</p>
  236. <example caption='Account owner publishes profile field(s)'><![CDATA[
  237. <iq type='set' id='pub1'>
  238. <pubsub xmlns='http://jabber.org/protocol/pubsub'>
  239. <publish node='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'>
  240. <item>
  241. <profile xmlns='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'>
  242. <x xmlns='jabber:x:data' type='result'>
  243. <field var='weblog'>
  244. <value>http://www.denmark.lit/blogs/princely_musings</value>
  245. </field>
  246. </x>
  247. </profile>
  248. </item>
  249. </publish>
  250. </pubsub>
  251. </iq>
  252. ]]></example>
  253. <p>The PEP service then MUST send notifications containing the updated field(s) to the node subscribers:</p>
  254. <example caption='Server generates notifications'><![CDATA[
  255. <message to='francisco@denmark.lit' from='hamlet@denmark.lit/elsinore' type='headline' id='foo'>
  256. <event xmlns='http://jabber.org/protocol/pubsub#event'>
  257. <items node='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'>
  258. <item>
  259. <profile xmlns='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'>
  260. <x xmlns='jabber:x:data' type='result'>
  261. <field var='weblog'>
  262. <value>http://www.denmark.lit/blogs/princely_musings</value>
  263. </field>
  264. </x>
  265. </profile>
  266. </item>
  267. </items>
  268. </event>
  269. </message>
  270. .
  271. .
  272. .
  273. ]]></example>
  274. <p>If the field(s) published are "public", the publisher SHOULD then repost the full profile as described above in order to keep the full profile in sync.</p>
  275. <p>Note: The account owner MAY decide to effectively maintain two profile subsets: public profile fields (posted via the "full profile" protocol) and restricted profile fields (published only via PEP). If so, the client MUST keep track of which fields are in the public profile subset and which fields are in the restricted profile subset, and MUST NOT update the full profile if the account owner has updated a field in the restricted profile set.</p>
  276. </section2>
  277. </section1>
  278. <section1 topic='Consumer Use Cases' anchor='consumer'>
  279. <section2 topic='Discovering Support' anchor='consumer-disco'>
  280. <p>If an entity can provide profile data directly using the standalone 'urn:xmpp:tmp:profile' namespace, it SHOULD advertise that feature in response to &xep0030; information requests:</p>
  281. <example caption='A request for service discovery information'><![CDATA[
  282. <iq type='get'
  283. from='bard@shakespeare.lit/globe'
  284. to='hamlet@denmark.lit'
  285. id='disco1'>
  286. <query xmlns='http://jabber.org/protocol/disco#info'/>
  287. </iq>
  288. ]]></example>
  289. <example caption='A service discovery information response'><![CDATA[
  290. <iq type='result'
  291. from='hamlet@denmark.lit'
  292. to='bard@shakespeare.lit/globe'
  293. id='disco1'>
  294. <query xmlns='http://jabber.org/protocol/disco#info'>
  295. <identity category='account' type='registered'/>
  296. <identity category='pubsub' type='pep'/>
  297. ...
  298. <feature var='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'/>
  299. ...
  300. </query>
  301. </iq>
  302. ]]></example>
  303. <p>Note: Because the foregoing request was sent to the bare JID &lt;hamlet@denmark.lit&gt;, the response is provided by the &lt;denmark.lit&gt; server on behalf of the registered account. The answer indicates that the server can provide profile data on behalf of the registered account and that it supports the personal eventing profile of XMPP Publish-Subscribe.</p>
  304. </section2>
  305. <section2 topic='Requesting Full Profile' anchor='consumer-full'>
  306. <p>In order to request the full profile, the requesting entity sends an IQ-get to the providing entity's JID, where the request contains an empty &lt;profile/&gt; element qualified by the 'urn:xmpp:tmp:profile' namespace. In this example, the request is sent to a server, not a user (any XMPP entity can have a profile, including servers, gateways, &xep0045; rooms, and the like):</p>
  307. <example caption='A request for profile data'><![CDATA[
  308. <iq type='get'
  309. from='hamlet@denmark.lit/elsinore'
  310. to='shakespeare.lit'
  311. id='iq1'>
  312. <profile xmlns='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'/>
  313. </iq>
  314. ]]></example>
  315. <p>The server then replies:</p>
  316. <example caption='A basic profile data response'><![CDATA[
  317. <iq type='result'
  318. from='shakespeare.lit'
  319. to='hamlet@denmark.lit/elsinore'
  320. id='iq1'>
  321. <profile xmlns='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'>
  322. <x xmlns='jabber:x:data' type='result'>
  323. <field var='FORM_TYPE' type='hidden'>
  324. <value>urn:xmpp:tmp:profile</value>
  325. </field>
  326. <field var='common_name'>
  327. <value>shakespeare.lit IM server</value>
  328. </field>
  329. <field var='country'>
  330. <value>UK</value>
  331. </field>
  332. <field var='region'>
  333. <value>England</value>
  334. </field>
  335. <field var='locality'>
  336. <value>London</value>
  337. </field>
  338. <field var='area'>
  339. <value>Bankside</value>
  340. </field>
  341. <field var='street'>
  342. <value>21 New Globe Walk</value>
  343. </field>
  344. <field var='postalcode'>
  345. <value>SE1 9DT</value>
  346. </field>
  347. <field var='lat'>
  348. <value>51.5076</value>
  349. </field>
  350. <field var='lon'>
  351. <value>-0.0953</value>
  352. </field>
  353. <field var='landline_phone'>
  354. <value>+44 20 7902 1400</value>
  355. </field>
  356. <field var='fax'>
  357. <value>+44 20 7902 1401</value>
  358. </field>
  359. <field var='building'>
  360. <value>Globe Theatre</value>
  361. </field>
  362. <field var='email'>
  363. <value>admin@shakespeare.lit</value>
  364. </field>
  365. </x>
  366. </profile>
  367. </iq>
  368. ]]></example>
  369. <p>If a server supports stored profile data for user accounts that it hosts, a requesting entity can request the full profile for such an account:</p>
  370. <example caption='A request for hosted profile data'><![CDATA[
  371. <iq type='get'
  372. from='bard@shakespeare.lit/globe'
  373. to='hamlet@denmark.lit'
  374. id='iq2'>
  375. <profile xmlns='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'/>
  376. </iq>
  377. ]]></example>
  378. <p>If the requesting entity is not allowed to retrieve hosted profiles (e.g., because it is not on a whitelist of entities permitted to "spider" the server's users), the server SHOULD return a &unavailable; error:</p>
  379. <example caption='Server returns service unavailable error'><![CDATA[
  380. <iq type='error'
  381. from='hamlet@denmark.lit'
  382. to='bard@shakespeare.lit/globe'
  383. id='iq2'>
  384. <profile xmlns='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'/>
  385. <error code='503' type='cancel'>
  386. <service-unavailable xmlns='urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:xmpp-stanzas'/>
  387. </error>
  388. </iq>
  389. ]]></example>
  390. <p>If the requested account does not exist or has not published profile data, the server also SHOULD return a &unavailable; error.</p>
  391. <p>Otherwise, the server SHOULD return the profile for the hosted account.</p>
  392. <example caption='Server returns profile data'><![CDATA[
  393. <iq type='result'
  394. from='hamlet@denmark.lit'
  395. to='bard@shakespeare.lit/globe'
  396. id='iq2'>
  397. <profile xmlns='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'>
  398. <x xmlns='jabber:x:data' type='result'>
  399. <field var='FORM_TYPE' type='hidden'>
  400. <value>urn:xmpp:tmp:profile</value>
  401. </field>
  402. <field var='nickname'>
  403. <value>Hamlet</value>
  404. </field>
  405. <field var='country'>
  406. <value>DK</value>
  407. </field>
  408. <field var='locality'>
  409. <value>Elsinore</value>
  410. </field>
  411. <field var='email'>
  412. <value>hamlet@denmark.lit</value>
  413. </field>
  414. <field var='weblog'>
  415. <value>http://www.denmark.lit/blogs/princely_musings</value>
  416. </field>
  417. </x>
  418. </profile>
  419. </iq>
  420. ]]></example>
  421. </section2>
  422. <section2 topic='Receiving Profile Updates' anchor='consumer-sub'>
  423. <p>In order to receive updated fields for a contact's profile, an entity shall encapsulate a feature of "urn:xmpp:tmp:profile+notify" in its &xep0115; data. If the contact's server supports the personal eventing profile of XMPP Publish-Subscribe as described in <cite>XEP-0163</cite>, the entity will receive notifications whenever the contact sends updated profile fields to the profile node:</p>
  424. <example caption='Entity receives notification'><![CDATA[
  425. <message to='francisco@denmark.lit' from='hamlet@denmark.lit/elsinore' type='headline' id='foo'>
  426. <event xmlns='http://jabber.org/protocol/pubsub#event'>
  427. <items node='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'>
  428. <item>
  429. <profile xmlns='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'>
  430. <x xmlns='jabber:x:data' type='result'>
  431. <field var='weblog'>
  432. <value>http://www.denmark.lit/blogs/princely_musings</value>
  433. </field>
  434. </x>
  435. </profile>
  436. </item>
  437. </items>
  438. </event>
  439. </message>
  440. ]]></example>
  441. <p>It is the responsibility of the receiving entity to correctly process the notification and update the local representation of the contact's profile information.</p>
  442. </section2>
  443. </section1>
  444. <section1 topic='Data Representation' anchor='fields'>
  445. <p>The following subsections specify common fields for defining various aspects of a person, which shall form the initial submission to the XMPP Registrar; many of these fields map to elements specified in vCard, xNAL, FOAF, LDAP (see &rfc2252;, &rfc2256;, and &rfc2798;) <note>This specification does not require that profile data fields mapped to LDAP fields must adhere to the X.500 data types that are re-used by LDAP. However, implementations MAY enforce those data types if desired.</note>, and LDAP object classes such as Person, organizationalPerson, inetOrgPerson, and eduPerson.</p>
  446. <section2 topic='Name Data Aspects' anchor='fields-name'>
  447. <p>Mappings are provided to vCard, LDAP, xNAL, and FOAF.</p>
  448. <section3 topic='Display Name' anchor='display_name'>
  449. <p>A display name is a version of a person's name intended for display in a user interface. Sometimes also called a "full name" or "formatted name".</p>
  450. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a display name is "display_name".</p>
  451. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  452. <ul>
  453. <li>vCard FN</li>
  454. <li>LDAP displayName</li>
  455. <li>FOAF name</li>
  456. </ul>
  457. <example caption='Display Name'><![CDATA[
  458. <field var='display_name'>
  459. <value>Peter Saint-Andre</value>
  460. </field>
  461. ]]></example>
  462. </section3>
  463. <section3 topic='Familiar Name' anchor='familiar_name'>
  464. <p>A familiar name is a shortened or modified form of someone's given name that may be used in somewhat informal contexts or that is preferred by the person (e.g., "Chuck" instead of "Charles").</p>
  465. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a familiar name is "familiar_name".</p>
  466. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  467. <ul>
  468. <li>eduPersonNickname</li>
  469. </ul>
  470. <example caption='Familiar Name'><![CDATA[
  471. <field var='familiar_name'>
  472. <value>Pete</value>
  473. </field>
  474. ]]></example>
  475. </section3>
  476. <section3 topic='Family Name' anchor='family_name'>
  477. <p>A family name is that part of a person's name which signifies the person's primary family association. Sometimes also called a "last name" or "surname".</p>
  478. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a family name is "family_name".</p>
  479. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  480. <ul>
  481. <li>vCard FAMILY</li>
  482. <li>LDAP sn</li>
  483. <li>xNAL LastName</li>
  484. <li>FOAF family_name</li>
  485. <li>FOAF surname</li>
  486. </ul>
  487. <example caption='Family Name'><![CDATA[
  488. <field var='family_name'>
  489. <value>Saint-Andre</value>
  490. </field>
  491. ]]></example>
  492. </section3>
  493. <section3 topic='Given Name' anchor='given_name'>
  494. <p>A given name is that part of a person's name which signifies the person's primary individual identity. Sometimes also called a "first name" or (in some countries) a "Christian name".</p>
  495. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a given name is "given_name".</p>
  496. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  497. <ul>
  498. <li>vCard GIVEN</li>
  499. <li>LDAP givenName</li>
  500. <li>xNAL FirstName</li>
  501. <li>FOAF first_name</li>
  502. <li>FOAF givenname</li>
  503. </ul>
  504. <example caption='Given Name'><![CDATA[
  505. <field var='given_name'>
  506. <value>J.</value>
  507. </field>
  508. ]]></example>
  509. </section3>
  510. <section3 topic='Middle Name' anchor='middle_name'>
  511. <p>A middle name is that part of a person's name which signifies the person's secondary individual identity. Sometimes also called a "middle initial".</p>
  512. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a middle name is "middle_name".</p>
  513. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  514. <ul>
  515. <li>vCard MIDDLE</li>
  516. <li>xNAL MiddleName</li>
  517. </ul>
  518. <example caption='Middle Name'><![CDATA[
  519. <field var='middle_name'>
  520. <value>Peter</value>
  521. </field>
  522. ]]></example>
  523. </section3>
  524. <section3 topic='Name Prefix' anchor='name_prefix'>
  525. <p>A name prefix is that part of a person's name which prepends the person's full name (e.g., Mr or Dr). Sometimes also called an "honorific" or "title".</p>
  526. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a name prefix is "name_prefix".</p>
  527. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  528. <ul>
  529. <li>vCard PREFIX</li>
  530. <li>xNAL Title</li>
  531. <li>FOAF title</li>
  532. </ul>
  533. <example caption='Name Prefix'><![CDATA[
  534. <field var='name_prefix'>
  535. <value>Mr</value>
  536. </field>
  537. ]]></example>
  538. </section3>
  539. <section3 topic='Name Suffix' anchor='name_suffix'>
  540. <p>A name suffix is that part of a person's name which is appended to the person's full name (e.g., Jr or Esq).</p>
  541. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a name suffix is "name_suffix".</p>
  542. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  543. <ul>
  544. <li>vCard SUFFIX</li>
  545. <li>xNAL GeneralSuffix</li>
  546. </ul>
  547. <example caption='Name Suffix'><![CDATA[
  548. <field var='name_suffix'>
  549. <value>Esq</value>
  550. </field>
  551. ]]></example>
  552. </section3>
  553. <section3 topic='Nickname' anchor='nickname'>
  554. <p>A nickname is a global, memorable (but not unique) friendly or informal name chosen by the owner of a JID. The purpose of a nickname is to associate a distinctive mapping between the person's unique JID and non-unique nickname. A nickname is normally used in online contexts (e.g., in chatrooms) that are less formal than real life (where a person's <link url='#familiar_name'>Familiar Name</link> would be more appropriate). Sometimes also called an "alias". A person SHOULD specify only one nickname (i.e., not more than one).</p>
  555. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a nickname is "nickname".</p>
  556. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  557. <ul>
  558. <li>vCard NICKNAME</li>
  559. <li>xNAL Alias</li>
  560. <li>FOAF nick</li>
  561. </ul>
  562. <example caption='Nickname'><![CDATA[
  563. <field var='nickname'>
  564. <value>stpeter</value>
  565. </field>
  566. ]]></example>
  567. </section3>
  568. <section3 topic='Patronymic' anchor='patronymic'>
  569. <p>In some cultures, one's name includes a part that is derived from the given name of one's father; this part of one's name is called a "patronymic".</p>
  570. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a patronymic is "patronymic".</p>
  571. <example caption='A Patronymic'><![CDATA[
  572. <field var='patronymic'>
  573. <value>Ivanovich</value>
  574. </field>
  575. ]]></example>
  576. </section3>
  577. </section2>
  578. <section2 topic='Physical Address Data Aspects' anchor='fields-physicaladdress'>
  579. <p>Mappings are provided to vCard, xNAL, and XEP-0112 (&xep0112;).</p>
  580. <section3 topic='Country' anchor='country'>
  581. <p>A country is the sovereign nation in which a person is located. Sometimes also called a "nation".</p>
  582. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a country are "country", "home_country", and "work_country" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  583. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  584. <ul>
  585. <li>vCard COUNTRY (or XEP-0054 CTRY), optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  586. <li>LDAP c</li>
  587. <li>xNAL CountryName</li>
  588. <li>XEP-0112 country</li>
  589. </ul>
  590. <example caption='Country'><![CDATA[
  591. <field var='country'>
  592. <value>USA</value>
  593. </field>
  594. ]]></example>
  595. </section3>
  596. <section3 topic='Region' anchor='region'>
  597. <p>A region is a second-level administrative unit within the nation in which a person is located. Sometimes also called a "province", "state", or "administrative area".</p>
  598. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a region is "region".</p>
  599. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a region are "home_region" and "work_region" for home addresses and work addresses respectively.</p>
  600. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  601. <ul>
  602. <li>vCard REGION, optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  603. <li>LDAP st</li>
  604. <li>xNAL AdministrativeAreaName</li>
  605. <li>XEP-0112 region</li>
  606. </ul>
  607. <example caption='Region'><![CDATA[
  608. <field var='region'>
  609. <value>New York</value>
  610. </field>
  611. ]]></example>
  612. </section3>
  613. <section3 topic='Locality' anchor='locality'>
  614. <p>A locality is a defined place within the region in which a person is located. Sometimes also called a "city", "town", or "village".</p>
  615. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a locality are "locality", "home_locality", and "work_locality" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  616. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  617. <ul>
  618. <li>vCard LOCALITY, optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  619. <li>LDAP l</li>
  620. <li>xNAL LocalityName</li>
  621. <li>XEP-0112 locality</li>
  622. </ul>
  623. <example caption='Locality'><![CDATA[
  624. <field var='locality'>
  625. <value>New York City</value>
  626. </field>
  627. ]]></example>
  628. </section3>
  629. <section3 topic='Area' anchor='area'>
  630. <p>An area is a sub-division within the locality in which a person is located. Sometimes also called a "neighborhood", "suburb", "district", or "section".</p>
  631. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a area are "area", "home_area", and "work_area" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  632. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  633. <ul>
  634. <li>xNAL DependentLocalityName</li>
  635. <li>XEP-0112 area</li>
  636. </ul>
  637. <example caption='Area'><![CDATA[
  638. <field var='area'>
  639. <value>Manhattan</value>
  640. </field>
  641. ]]></example>
  642. </section3>
  643. <section3 topic='Street' anchor='street'>
  644. <p>A street is the street address (number plus street name, or two street names at an intersection) at which a person is located, or a postal box number for physical mail delivery. Sometimes also called a "street address".</p>
  645. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a street are "street", "home_street", and "work_street" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  646. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  647. <ul>
  648. <li>vCard STREET, optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  649. <li>LDAP street</li>
  650. <li>xNAL ThoroughfareNumber + ThoroughfareName</li>
  651. <li>XEP-0112 street</li>
  652. </ul>
  653. <example caption='Street'><![CDATA[
  654. <field var='street'>
  655. <value>Fifth Avenue and 34th Street</value>
  656. </field>
  657. ]]></example>
  658. </section3>
  659. <section3 topic='Building' anchor='building'>
  660. <p>A building is the name for a specific structure on a street or within an area.</p>
  661. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a building are "building", "home_building", and "work_building" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  662. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  663. <ul>
  664. <li>vCard EXTADR, optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  665. <li>xNAL BuildingName</li>
  666. <li>XEP-0112 building</li>
  667. </ul>
  668. <example caption='Building'><![CDATA[
  669. <field var='building'>
  670. <value>Empire State Building</value>
  671. </field>
  672. ]]></example>
  673. </section3>
  674. <section3 topic='Floor' anchor='floor'>
  675. <p>A floor is a named or numbered floor or level within a building. Sometimes also called a "level", "block", or "suite".</p>
  676. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a floor are "floor", "home_floor", and "work_floor" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  677. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  678. <ul>
  679. <li>vCard EXTADR, optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  680. <li>xNAL SubPremiseNumber</li>
  681. <li>XEP-0112 floor</li>
  682. </ul>
  683. <example caption='Floor'><![CDATA[
  684. <field var='floor'>
  685. <value>102</value>
  686. </field>
  687. ]]></example>
  688. </section3>
  689. <section3 topic='Room' anchor='room'>
  690. <p>A room is a named or numbered subdivision of a floor. Sometimes also called a "unit" or "apartment".</p>
  691. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a room are "room", "home_room", and "work_room" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  692. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  693. <ul>
  694. <li>vCard EXTADR, optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  695. <li>LDAP roomNumber</li>
  696. <li>xNAL SubPremiseNumber</li>
  697. <li>XEP-0112 room</li>
  698. </ul>
  699. <example caption='Room'><![CDATA[
  700. <field var='room'>
  701. <value>Observatory</value>
  702. </field>
  703. ]]></example>
  704. </section3>
  705. <section3 topic='Postal Box' anchor='postalbox'>
  706. <p>A postal box is a set of numeric or alphanumeric characters used to identify a mailbox at a postal delivery center.</p>
  707. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a postal box are "postalbox", "home_postalbox", and "work_postalbox" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  708. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  709. <ul>
  710. <li>vCard POBOX, optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  711. <li>LDAP postOfficeBox</li>
  712. </ul>
  713. <example caption='Postal Box'><![CDATA[
  714. <field var='postalbox'>
  715. <value>1641</value>
  716. </field>
  717. ]]></example>
  718. </section3>
  719. <section3 topic='Postal Code' anchor='postalcode'>
  720. <p>A postal code is a set of numeric or alphanumeric characters used to identify an area for postal delivery. Sometimes also called a "ZIP code" (in the U.S.).</p>
  721. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a postal code are "postalcode", "home_postalcode", and "work_postalcode" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  722. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  723. <ul>
  724. <li>vCard PCODE, optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  725. <li>LDAP postalCode</li>
  726. <li>xNAL PostalCodeNumber</li>
  727. <li>XEP-0112 postalcode</li>
  728. </ul>
  729. <example caption='Postal Code'><![CDATA[
  730. <field var='postalcode'>
  731. <value>10002</value>
  732. </field>
  733. ]]></example>
  734. </section3>
  735. <section3 topic='Postal Address' anchor='postaladdress'>
  736. <p>A postal address is a free-form mailing address, which may be easier to enter (or, in some cultural contexts, more appropriate) than the atomic address parts such as street, floor, etc.</p>
  737. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a postal address are "postaladdress", "home_postaladdress", and "work_postaladdress" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  738. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  739. <ul>
  740. <li>LDAP postalAddress, homePostalAddress</li>
  741. </ul>
  742. <example caption='Postal Address'><![CDATA[
  743. <field var='work_postaladdress'>
  744. <value>1899 Wynkoop Street</value>
  745. <value>Suite 600</value>
  746. <value>Denver, CO 80202</value>
  747. <value>USA</value>
  748. </field>
  749. ]]></example>
  750. </section3>
  751. </section2>
  752. <section2 topic='Geolocation Data Aspects' anchor='fields-geoloc'>
  753. <p>Mappings are provided to vCard and XEP-0080 (&xep0080;).</p>
  754. <section3 topic='Altitude' anchor='alt'>
  755. <p>Altitude is a person's height or depth in relationship to sea level, where positive altitude is meters above sea level and negative altitude is meters below sea level.</p>
  756. <p>The Data Forms field that represents altitude is "alt".</p>
  757. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  758. <ul>
  759. <li>XEP-0080 alt</li>
  760. </ul>
  761. <example caption='Altitude'><![CDATA[
  762. <field var='alt'>
  763. <value>1609</value>
  764. </field>
  765. ]]></example>
  766. </section3>
  767. <section3 topic='Latitude' anchor='lat'>
  768. <p>Latitude is a person's latitude in relation to the equator, where positive latitude is north of the equator and negative latitude is south of the equator.</p>
  769. <p>The Data Forms field that represents latitude is "lat".</p>
  770. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  771. <ul>
  772. <li>vCard LAT</li>
  773. <li>XEP-0080 lat</li>
  774. </ul>
  775. <example caption='Latitude'><![CDATA[
  776. <field var='lat'>
  777. <value>39.75477</value>
  778. </field>
  779. ]]></example>
  780. </section3>
  781. <section3 topic='Longitude' anchor='lon'>
  782. <p>Longitude is a person's longitude in relation to the equator, where positive longitude is east of the meridian and negative longitude is west of the equator.</p>
  783. <p>The Data Forms field that represents longitude is "lon".</p>
  784. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  785. <ul>
  786. <li>vCard LON</li>
  787. <li>XEP-0080 lon</li>
  788. </ul>
  789. <example caption='Latitude'><![CDATA[
  790. <field var='lon'>
  791. <value>-104.99768</value>
  792. </field>
  793. ]]></example>
  794. </section3>
  795. </section2>
  796. <section2 topic='Telephony Address Data Aspects' anchor='fields-tel'>
  797. <section3 topic='Fax Number' anchor='fax'>
  798. <p>A fax number is a number for a machine that handles fascimile transmissions.</p>
  799. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a fax number are "fax", "home_fax", and "work_fax" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  800. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  801. <ul>
  802. <li>vCard TEL (+ "FAX" modifier), optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  803. <li>LDAP facsimileTelephoneNumber</li>
  804. </ul>
  805. <example caption='Fax Number'><![CDATA[
  806. <field var='fax'>
  807. <value>303-308-3215</value>
  808. </field>
  809. ]]></example>
  810. </section3>
  811. <section3 topic='Landline Telephone Number' anchor='landline'>
  812. <p>A landline telephone number is a number for a traditional "PSTN" or "POTS" telephone.</p>
  813. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a landline telephone number are "landline", "home_landline", and "work_landline" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  814. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  815. <ul>
  816. <li>vCard TEL, optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  817. <li>LDAP telephoneNumber</li>
  818. <li>FOAF phone</li>
  819. </ul>
  820. <example caption='Landline Telephone Number'><![CDATA[
  821. <field var='landline_phone'>
  822. <value>303-308-3282</value>
  823. </field>
  824. ]]></example>
  825. </section3>
  826. <section3 topic='Mobile Telephone Number' anchor='mobile'>
  827. <p>A mobile telephone number is a number for a mobile phone or cell phone on a wireless network.</p>
  828. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a mobile telephone number are "mobile", "home_mobile", and "work_mobile" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  829. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  830. <ul>
  831. <li>vCard TEL (+ "CELL" modifier), optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  832. <li>LDAP mobile</li>
  833. <li>FOAF phone</li>
  834. </ul>
  835. <example caption='Mobile Telephone Number'><![CDATA[
  836. <field var='mobile_phone'>
  837. <value>303-555-1212</value>
  838. </field>
  839. ]]></example>
  840. </section3>
  841. <section3 topic='Pager Number' anchor='pager'>
  842. <p>A pager number is a number for a dedicated alphanumeric paging device.</p>
  843. <p>The Data Forms fields that represent a pager number are "pager", "home_pager", and "work_pager" for generic addresses, home addresses, and work addresses respectively.</p>
  844. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  845. <ul>
  846. <li>vCard TEL (+ "PAGER" modifier), optionally supplemented with the "HOME" or "WORK" type</li>
  847. <li>LDAP pager</li>
  848. </ul>
  849. <example caption='Pager Number'><![CDATA[
  850. <field var='pager'>
  851. <value>303-555-1212</value>
  852. </field>
  853. ]]></example>
  854. </section3>
  855. <section3 topic='SIP Address' anchor='sip_address'>
  856. <p>A SIP address is a sip: or sips: URI at which a person can be contacted for Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) communications.</p>
  857. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a SIP address is "sip_address".</p>
  858. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  859. <example caption='SIP Address'><![CDATA[
  860. <field var='sip_address'>
  861. <value>sip:stpeter@sipspeare.lit</value>
  862. </field>
  863. ]]></example>
  864. </section3>
  865. <section3 topic='Skype Address' anchor='skype_address'>
  866. <p>A Skype address is an address on the popular Skype system for Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) communications.</p>
  867. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a Skype address is "skype_address".</p>
  868. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  869. <example caption='Skype Address'><![CDATA[
  870. <field var='skype_address'>
  871. <value>SomeSkypeUser</value>
  872. </field>
  873. ]]></example>
  874. </section3>
  875. <section3 topic='Videophone Address' anchor='video_phone'>
  876. <p>A videophone address is an address used for for H.323 video conferencing systems.</p>
  877. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a videophone address is "video_phone".</p>
  878. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  879. <example caption='Videophone Address'><![CDATA[
  880. <field var='video_phone'>
  881. <value>foo</value>
  882. </field>
  883. ]]></example>
  884. </section3>
  885. </section2>
  886. <section2 topic='Electronic Address Data Aspects' anchor='fields-net'>
  887. <section3 topic='AIM Screen Name' anchor='aim_id'>
  888. <p>An AIM screen name is an address at which a person or other entity can be contacted on the AOL Instant Messenger service.</p>
  889. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an AIM screen name is "aim_id".</p>
  890. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  891. <ul>
  892. <li>FOAF aimChatID</li>
  893. </ul>
  894. <example caption='AIM Screen Name'><![CDATA[
  895. <field var='aim_id'>
  896. <value>psaintandre</value>
  897. </field>
  898. ]]></example>
  899. </section3>
  900. <section3 topic='Email Address' anchor='email'>
  901. <p>An email address is the value of a mailto: URI at which a person or other entity can be contacted using standard electronic mail protocols.</p>
  902. <p>The Data Forms field that represents longitude is "email".</p>
  903. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  904. <ul>
  905. <li>vCard EMAIL</li>
  906. <li>LDAP mail</li>
  907. </ul>
  908. <example caption='Email address'><![CDATA[
  909. <field var='email'>
  910. <value>stpeter@jabber.org</value>
  911. <value>stpeter@gmail.com</value>
  912. </field>
  913. ]]></example>
  914. </section3>
  915. <section3 topic='ICQ Number' anchor='icq_id'>
  916. <p>An ICQ number is an address at which a person or other entity can be contacted on the ICQ instant messaging service.</p>
  917. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an ICQ number is "icq_id".</p>
  918. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  919. <ul>
  920. <li>FOAF icqChatID</li>
  921. </ul>
  922. <example caption='ICQ number'><![CDATA[
  923. <field var='icq_id'>
  924. <value>70902454</value>
  925. </field>
  926. ]]></example>
  927. </section3>
  928. <section3 topic='Jabber ID' anchor='jid'>
  929. <p>A Jabber ID is the value of an xmpp: URI at which a person or other entity can be contacted over a Jabber/XMPP network.</p>
  930. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a Jabber ID is "jid".</p>
  931. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  932. <ul>
  933. <li>FOAF jabberID</li>
  934. </ul>
  935. <example caption='Jabber ID'><![CDATA[
  936. <field var='jid'>
  937. <value>stpeter@jabber.org</value>
  938. <value>peter@saint-andre.com</value>
  939. </field>
  940. ]]></example>
  941. </section3>
  942. <section3 topic='MSN Address' anchor='msn_id'>
  943. <p>An MSN address is address at which a person or other entity can be contacted on the MSN instant messaging service.</p>
  944. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an MSN address is "msn_id".</p>
  945. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  946. <ul>
  947. <li>FOAF msnChatID</li>
  948. </ul>
  949. <example caption='MSN Address'><![CDATA[
  950. <field var='msn_id'>
  951. <value>petersaintandre@hotmail.com</value>
  952. </field>
  953. ]]></example>
  954. </section3>
  955. <section3 topic='Yahoo ID' anchor='yahoo_id'>
  956. <p>A Yahoo ID is address at which a person or other entity can be contacted on the Yahoo! Instant Messenger service.</p>
  957. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a Yahoo ID is "yahoo_id".</p>
  958. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  959. <ul>
  960. <li>FOAF yahooChatID</li>
  961. </ul>
  962. <example caption='Yahoo ID'><![CDATA[
  963. <field var='yahoo_id'>
  964. <value>psaintandre</value>
  965. </field>
  966. ]]></example>
  967. </section3>
  968. </section2>
  969. <section2 topic='World Wide Web Resource Aspects' anchor='fields-www'>
  970. <section3 topic='Avatar URL' anchor='avatar_url'>
  971. <p>An avatar is an often fanciful representation of a user's desired self-image or persona (e.g., in the context of a game). An avatar is usually not intended to be an accurate picture of the user's actual physical appearance (that is handled by the photo_url and photo_data fields).</p>
  972. <p>An avatar can come in two forms: the avatar data itself, or a URL for a avatar.</p>
  973. <p>The Data Forms field that represents the URL for an avatar is "avatar_url".</p>
  974. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  975. <example caption='Avatar URL'><![CDATA[
  976. <field var='avatar_url'>
  977. <value>http://www.saint-andre.com/images/stpeter_small.jpg</value>
  978. </field>
  979. ]]></example>
  980. </section3>
  981. <section3 topic='Biographical URL' anchor='bio'>
  982. <p>A biographical URL is the value of an http: URI at which can be found biographical information about a person.</p>
  983. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a biographical URL is "bio".</p>
  984. <example caption='Biographical URL'><![CDATA[
  985. <field var='bio'>
  986. <value>http://www.xmpp.org/xsf/people/stpeter.shtml</value>
  987. <value>http://www.saint-andre.com/me/</value>
  988. </field>
  989. ]]></example>
  990. </section3>
  991. <section3 topic='FOAF URL' anchor='foaf_url'>
  992. <p>A FOAF URL is the value of an http: URI at which can be found a "friend of a friend" (FOAF) file about a person or entity.</p>
  993. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a FOAF URL is "foaf_url".</p>
  994. <example caption='FOAF URL'><![CDATA[
  995. <field var='foaf_url'>
  996. <value>http://www.saint-andre.com/me/foaf.rdf</value>
  997. </field>
  998. ]]></example>
  999. </section3>
  1000. <section3 topic='Homepage URL' anchor='homepage'>
  1001. <p>A homepage URL is the value of an http: URI that is the default resource on the World Wide Web for a person or other entity.</p>
  1002. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a homepage URL is "homepage".</p>
  1003. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1004. <ul>
  1005. <li>LDAP labelledURI</li>
  1006. <li>FOAF homepage</li>
  1007. </ul>
  1008. <example caption='Homepage URL'><![CDATA[
  1009. <field var='homepage'>
  1010. <value>http://www.saint-andre.com/</value>
  1011. </field>
  1012. ]]></example>
  1013. </section3>
  1014. <section3 topic='OpenID' anchor='openid'>
  1015. <p>An OpenID is the value of a URI by which a person can sign onto multiple websites or other Internet services using a single identifier (see &lt;<link url='http://openid.net/'>http://openid.net/</link>&gt;).</p>
  1016. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an OpenID is "openid".</p>
  1017. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1018. <ul>
  1019. <li>FOAF openid</li>
  1020. </ul>
  1021. <example caption='OpenID'><![CDATA[
  1022. <field var='openid'>
  1023. <value>https://stpeter.startssl.com/</value>
  1024. </field>
  1025. ]]></example>
  1026. </section3>
  1027. <section3 topic='Photo URL' anchor='photo_url'>
  1028. <p>A photograph provides a pictorial representation of a person. Sometimes also called a "mugshot".</p>
  1029. <p>A photograph can come in two forms: the photo data itself (see below) or a URL for a photograph (e.g., the vCard PHOTO element can represent either, while the FOAF depiction and FOAF img can represent only a URL). The Data Forms field specified here identifies a URL for a photograph, not the data itself.</p>
  1030. <p>The Data Forms field that represents the URL for a photograph is "photo_url".</p>
  1031. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1032. <ul>
  1033. <li>vCard PHOTO</li>
  1034. <li>FOAF depiction</li>
  1035. <li>FOAF img</li>
  1036. </ul>
  1037. <example caption='Photo URL'><![CDATA[
  1038. <field var='photo_url'>
  1039. <value>http://www.saint-andre.com/images/stpeter.jpg</value>
  1040. <value>http://www.saint-andre.com/images/stpeter_hell.jpg</value>
  1041. <value>http://www.saint-andre.com/images/stpeter_oscon.jpg</value>
  1042. </field>
  1043. ]]></example>
  1044. </section3>
  1045. <section3 topic='Publications URL' anchor='publications'>
  1046. <p>A publications URL is the value of an http: URI at which can be found the list of a person's published writings.</p>
  1047. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a publications URL is "publications".</p>
  1048. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1049. <ul>
  1050. <li>FOAF publications</li>
  1051. </ul>
  1052. <example caption='Publications URL'><![CDATA[
  1053. <field var='publications'>
  1054. <value>http://www.saint-andre.com/thoughts/publications.html</value>
  1055. </field>
  1056. ]]></example>
  1057. </section3>
  1058. <section3 topic='Resume URL' anchor='resume'>
  1059. <p>A resume URL is the value of an http: URI at which can be found a person's resume or curriculum vitae.</p>
  1060. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a resume URL is "resume".</p>
  1061. <example caption='Resume URL'><![CDATA[
  1062. <field var='resume'>
  1063. <value>http://www.saint-andre.com/work/</value>
  1064. </field>
  1065. ]]></example>
  1066. </section3>
  1067. <section3 topic='Status URL' anchor='status_url'>
  1068. <p>A status URL is the value of an http: URI that specifies the current status of a person or other entity (e.g., a person's online presence or a server's uptime).</p>
  1069. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a homepage URL is "status_url".</p>
  1070. <example caption='Status URL'><![CDATA[
  1071. <field var='status_url'>
  1072. <value>http://status.jabber.org/</value>
  1073. </field>
  1074. ]]></example>
  1075. </section3>
  1076. <section3 topic='Organizational URL' anchor='org_url'>
  1077. <p>An organizational URL is the value of an http: URI that specifies the homepage for an organization or employer.</p>
  1078. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an organizational URL is "org_url".</p>
  1079. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1080. <ul>
  1081. <li>FOAF workplaceHomepage</li>
  1082. </ul>
  1083. <example caption='Organizational URL'><![CDATA[
  1084. <field var='org_url'>
  1085. <value>http://www.jabber.org/</value>
  1086. </field>
  1087. ]]></example>
  1088. </section3>
  1089. <section3 topic='Weblog URL' anchor='weblog'>
  1090. <p>A weblog URL is the value of an http: URI at which a person or other entity maintains a weblog.</p>
  1091. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a weblog URL is "weblog".</p>
  1092. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1093. <ul>
  1094. <li>FOAF weblog</li>
  1095. </ul>
  1096. <example caption='Weblog URL'><![CDATA[
  1097. <field var='weblog'>
  1098. <value>http://www.saint-andre.com/blog/</value>
  1099. </field>
  1100. ]]></example>
  1101. </section3>
  1102. </section2>
  1103. <section2 topic='Organizational Data Aspects' anchor='fields-org'>
  1104. <section3 topic='Alternative Contact' anchor='alt_contact'>
  1105. <p>It may be appropriate to list others who can be contacted if the individual is not available.</p>
  1106. <example caption='Alternative Contact'><![CDATA[
  1107. <field var='alt_contact'>
  1108. <value>xmpp:peter@jabber.org</value>
  1109. </field>
  1110. ]]></example>
  1111. </section3>
  1112. <section3 topic='Affiliation' anchor='affiliation'>
  1113. <p>An affiliation is a person's relationship to an institution, such as student, faculty, intern, fellow. An affiliation is in general less rigid than an <link url='#employee_type'>Employee Type</link>, which may not be relevant in noncommercial organizations.</p>
  1114. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an organizational affiliation is "affiliation".</p>
  1115. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1116. <ul>
  1117. <li>LDAP eduPersonAffiliation</li>
  1118. </ul>
  1119. <example caption='Affiliation'><![CDATA[
  1120. <field var='affiliation'>
  1121. <value>faculty</value>
  1122. </field>
  1123. ]]></example>
  1124. </section3>
  1125. <section3 topic='Assistant' anchor='assistant'>
  1126. <p>In some organizations, a person may be assisted by another individual.</p>
  1127. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an assistant is "assistant".</p>
  1128. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1129. <ul>
  1130. <li>LDAP secretary</li>
  1131. </ul>
  1132. <example caption='Assistant'><![CDATA[
  1133. <field var='assistant'>
  1134. <value>Peter Pan</value>
  1135. </field>
  1136. ]]></example>
  1137. </section3>
  1138. <section3 topic='Business Category' anchor='business_category'>
  1139. <p>The kind of business performed by an organization.</p>
  1140. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a business category is "business_category".</p>
  1141. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1142. <ul>
  1143. <li>LDAP business_category</li>
  1144. </ul>
  1145. <example caption='Business Category'><![CDATA[
  1146. <field var='business_category'>
  1147. <value>Automobile sales</value>
  1148. </field>
  1149. ]]></example>
  1150. </section3>
  1151. <section3 topic='Department Name' anchor='department_name'>
  1152. <p>Some organizations have departments, which can be named or numbered.</p>
  1153. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a department name is "department_name".</p>
  1154. <example caption='Department Name'><![CDATA[
  1155. <field var='department_name'>
  1156. <value>Executive</value>
  1157. </field>
  1158. ]]></example>
  1159. </section3>
  1160. <section3 topic='Department Number' anchor='department_number'>
  1161. <p>Some organizations have departments, which can be named or numbered.</p>
  1162. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a department number is "department_number".</p>
  1163. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1164. <ul>
  1165. <li>LDAP departmentNumber</li>
  1166. </ul>
  1167. <example caption='Department Number'><![CDATA[
  1168. <field var='department_number'>
  1169. <value>5674</value>
  1170. </field>
  1171. ]]></example>
  1172. </section3>
  1173. <section3 topic='Employee Number' anchor='employee_number'>
  1174. <p>Some organizations assign numbers to employees.</p>
  1175. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an employee number is "employee_number".</p>
  1176. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1177. <ul>
  1178. <li>LDAP employeeNumber</li>
  1179. </ul>
  1180. <example caption='Employee Number'><![CDATA[
  1181. <field var='employee_number'>
  1182. <value>1</value>
  1183. </field>
  1184. ]]></example>
  1185. </section3>
  1186. <section3 topic='Employee Type' anchor='employee_type'>
  1187. <p>Some organizations have different types of employees, such as "full-time", "part-time", "contractor", and "temp".</p>
  1188. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an employee type is "employee_type".</p>
  1189. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1190. <ul>
  1191. <li>LDAP employeeType</li>
  1192. </ul>
  1193. <example caption='Employee Type'><![CDATA[
  1194. <field var='employee_type'>
  1195. <value>volunteer</value>
  1196. </field>
  1197. ]]></example>
  1198. </section3>
  1199. <section3 topic='Job Title' anchor='job_title'>
  1200. <p>A job title is the official name of a person's position within an organization.</p>
  1201. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a job title is "job_title".</p>
  1202. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1203. <ul>
  1204. <li>vCard TITLE</li>
  1205. <li>LDAP title</li>
  1206. <li>FOAF title</li>
  1207. </ul>
  1208. <example caption='Job Title'><![CDATA[
  1209. <field var='job_title'>
  1210. <value>Executive Director</value>
  1211. </field>
  1212. ]]></example>
  1213. </section3>
  1214. <section3 topic='Manager' anchor='manager'>
  1215. <p>In most organizations, a person is managed by or reports to another individual (often not exposed outside the organization).</p>
  1216. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a manager is "manager".</p>
  1217. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1218. <ul>
  1219. <li>LDAP manager</li>
  1220. </ul>
  1221. <example caption='Manager'><![CDATA[
  1222. <field var='manager'>
  1223. <value>William Shakespeare</value>
  1224. </field>
  1225. ]]></example>
  1226. </section3>
  1227. <section3 topic='Organizational Name' anchor='org_name'>
  1228. <p>An organizational name is the official name of an organization (company, school, etc.) within which a person works.</p>
  1229. <p>The Data Forms field that represents the name of an organization is "org_name".</p>
  1230. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1231. <ul>
  1232. <li>vCard ORGNAME</li>
  1233. <li>LDAP o</li>
  1234. </ul>
  1235. <example caption='Organizational Name'><![CDATA[
  1236. <field var='org_name'>
  1237. <value>XMPP Standards Foundation</value>
  1238. </field>
  1239. ]]></example>
  1240. </section3>
  1241. <section3 topic='Organizational Role' anchor='org_role'>
  1242. <p>An organizational role describes a person's profession or how a person contributes within an organization.</p>
  1243. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an organizational role is "org_role".</p>
  1244. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1245. <ul>
  1246. <li>vCard ROLE</li>
  1247. </ul>
  1248. <example caption='Organizational Role'><![CDATA[
  1249. <field var='org_role'>
  1250. <value>Patron Saint</value>
  1251. <value>Chief Evangelist</value>
  1252. <value>Glorified Tech Writer</value>
  1253. </field>
  1254. ]]></example>
  1255. </section3>
  1256. <section3 topic='Organizational Unit' anchor='org_unit'>
  1257. <p>An organizational unit is the name of part (subsidiary, department, etc.) of an organization.</p>
  1258. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an organizational unit is "org_unit".</p>
  1259. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1260. <ul>
  1261. <li>vCard ORGUNIT</li>
  1262. <li>LDAP ou</li>
  1263. </ul>
  1264. <example caption='Organizational Unit'><![CDATA[
  1265. <field var='org_unit'>
  1266. <value>Jabber Council</value>
  1267. </field>
  1268. ]]></example>
  1269. </section3>
  1270. <section3 topic='Primary Affiliation' anchor='primary_affiliation'>
  1271. <p>An affiliation is a person's relationship to an institution, such as student, faculty, intern, fellow. (An affiliation is in general less rigid than an <link url='#employee_type'>Employee Type</link>, which may not be relevant in noncommercial organizations.) Since a person may be affiliated with multiple organizations (e.g., multiple research institutions), the primary affiliation is used to describe a person's affiliation to their primary organization.</p>
  1272. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a primary organizational affiliation is "primary_affiliation".</p>
  1273. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1274. <ul>
  1275. <li>LDAP eduPersonPrimaryAffiliation</li>
  1276. </ul>
  1277. <example caption='Primary Affiliation'><![CDATA[
  1278. <field var='primary_affiliation'>
  1279. <value>fellow</value>
  1280. </field>
  1281. ]]></example>
  1282. </section3>
  1283. <section3 topic='Primary Organizational Name' anchor='primary_org_name'>
  1284. <p>An organizational name is the official name of an organization (company, school, etc.) within which a person works. Since a person may be affiliated with multiple organizations (e.g., multiple research institutions), the primary organizational name is used to differentiate the main organization with which a person is affiliated.</p>
  1285. <p>The Data Forms field that represents the name of a primary organization is "primary_org_name".</p>
  1286. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1287. <ul>
  1288. <li>vCard o</li>
  1289. </ul>
  1290. <example caption='Primary Organizational Name'><![CDATA[
  1291. <field var='primary_org_name'>
  1292. <value>Columbia University</value>
  1293. </field>
  1294. ]]></example>
  1295. </section3>
  1296. <section3 topic='Primary Organizational Role' anchor='primary_org_role'>
  1297. <p>An organizational role describes a person's profession or how a person contributes within an organization. Since a person may be affiliated with multiple organizations (e.g., multiple research institutions), the primary organizational role is used to differentiate the person's role at their primary organization.</p>
  1298. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an organizational role is "primary_org_role".</p>
  1299. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1300. <ul>
  1301. <li>vCard ROLE</li>
  1302. </ul>
  1303. <example caption='Primary Organizational Role'><![CDATA[
  1304. <field var='primary_org_role'>
  1305. <value>Professor Emeritus</value>
  1306. </field>
  1307. ]]></example>
  1308. </section3>
  1309. <section3 topic='Primary Organizational Unit' anchor='primary_org_unit'>
  1310. <p>An organizational unit is the name of part (subsidiary, department, etc.) of an organization Since a person may be affiliated with multiple organizational units (e.g., multiple schools within a university), the primary organizational name is used to differentiate the main organization with which a person is affiliated.</p>
  1311. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an organizational unit is "primary_org_unit".</p>
  1312. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1313. <ul>
  1314. <li>LDAP ou</li>
  1315. <li>LDAP eduPersonPrimaryOrgUnitDN</li>
  1316. </ul>
  1317. <example caption='Primary Organizational Unit'><![CDATA[
  1318. <field var='primary_org_unit'>
  1319. <value>Jabber Council</value>
  1320. </field>
  1321. ]]></example>
  1322. </section3>
  1323. <section3 topic='System Username' anchor='system_username'>
  1324. <p>Usually a person has a system or network username within an organization (usually not exposed outside the organization).</p>
  1325. <p>The Data Forms field that represents such a username is "system_username".</p>
  1326. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1327. <ul>
  1328. <li>LDAP uid</li>
  1329. <li>LDAP userid</li>
  1330. </ul>
  1331. <example caption='System Username'><![CDATA[
  1332. <field var='system_username'>
  1333. <value>psaintandre</value>
  1334. </field>
  1335. ]]></example>
  1336. </section3>
  1337. <section3 topic='Teams' anchor='teams'>
  1338. <p>People often work in teams. Sometimes it can be helpful to list those teams.</p>
  1339. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a work team is "teams".</p>
  1340. <example caption='Teams'><![CDATA[
  1341. <field var='teams'>
  1342. <value>Infrastructure Team</value>
  1343. <value>Jabber Council</value>
  1344. </field>
  1345. ]]></example>
  1346. </section3>
  1347. <section3 topic='Workstation Address' anchor='workstation'>
  1348. <p>Often a person has a dedicated workstation address or name within an organization (usually not exposed outside the organization).</p>
  1349. <p>The Data Forms field that represents such a username is "workstation".</p>
  1350. <example caption='Workstation Address'><![CDATA[
  1351. <field var='workstation'>
  1352. <value>squire</value>
  1353. </field>
  1354. ]]></example>
  1355. </section3>
  1356. </section2>
  1357. <section2 topic='Basic Personal Data Aspects' anchor='fields-basic'>
  1358. <p>These data fields are not necessarily permanent, but do not tend to change very often if at all.</p>
  1359. <section3 topic='Birth Day-of-Month' anchor='birth_dayofmonth'>
  1360. <p>A birth day-of-month is the day of the month in which a person was born. (Note: This data field is <em>not</em> what in English is usually referred to as a person's "birthday", i.e. the year+month+day on which the person was born; the "birthday" is split into three data fields in order to protect personal privacy, since a given individual might want to disclose his or her birth year, birth month, birth day-of-month, or some combination thereof but not all three.)</p>
  1361. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a birth day-of-month is "birth_dayofmonth".</p>
  1362. <p>When combined with other birthday-related fields, this field maps to:</p>
  1363. <ul>
  1364. <li>vCard BDAY</li>
  1365. </ul>
  1366. <example caption='Birth Day-of-Month'><![CDATA[
  1367. <field var='birth_dayofmonth'>
  1368. <value>06</value>
  1369. </field>
  1370. ]]></example>
  1371. </section3>
  1372. <section3 topic='Birth Month' anchor='birth_month'>
  1373. <p>A birth month is the month of the year in which a person was born.</p>
  1374. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a birth month is "birth_month".</p>
  1375. <p>When combined with other birthday-related fields, this field maps to:</p>
  1376. <ul>
  1377. <li>vCard BDAY</li>
  1378. </ul>
  1379. <example caption='Birth Month'><![CDATA[
  1380. <field var='birth_month'>
  1381. <value>08</value>
  1382. </field>
  1383. ]]></example>
  1384. </section3>
  1385. <section3 topic='Birth Year' anchor='birth_year'>
  1386. <p>A birth year is the year in which a person was born.</p>
  1387. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a birth year is "birth_year".</p>
  1388. <p>When combined with other birthday-related fields, this field maps to:</p>
  1389. <ul>
  1390. <li>vCard BDAY</li>
  1391. </ul>
  1392. <example caption='Birth Year'><![CDATA[
  1393. <field var='birth_year'>
  1394. <value>1966</value>
  1395. </field>
  1396. ]]></example>
  1397. </section3>
  1398. <section3 topic='Description' anchor='description'>
  1399. <p>It can be helpful to provide a natural-language description of a person.</p>
  1400. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a description of a person is "description".</p>
  1401. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1402. <ul>
  1403. <li>LDAP description</li>
  1404. </ul>
  1405. <example caption='Description'><![CDATA[
  1406. <field var='description'>
  1407. <value>I'm a Jabber fanatic.</value>
  1408. </field>
  1409. ]]></example>
  1410. </section3>
  1411. <section3 topic='Eye Color' anchor='eye_color'>
  1412. <p>Some people may want to know the color of a person's eyes. The allowable or recommended values for this field are not specified.</p>
  1413. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a person's eye color is "eye_color".</p>
  1414. <example caption='Eye Color'><![CDATA[
  1415. <field var='eye_color'>
  1416. <value>blue</value>
  1417. </field>
  1418. ]]></example>
  1419. </section3>
  1420. <section3 topic='Gender' anchor='gender'>
  1421. <p>Gender is the self-defined gender of a person (this is not limited to "male" and "female", although those are the expected values in most instances). Sometimes also called "sex" or "gender identification".</p>
  1422. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a person's gender is "gender".</p>
  1423. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1424. <ul>
  1425. <li>FOAF gender</li>
  1426. </ul>
  1427. <example caption='Gender'><![CDATA[
  1428. <field var='gender'>
  1429. <value>male</value>
  1430. </field>
  1431. ]]></example>
  1432. </section3>
  1433. <section3 topic='Hair Color' anchor='hair_color'>
  1434. <p>Some people may want to know the color of a person's hair (if any). The allowable or recommended values for this field are not specified.</p>
  1435. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a person's hair color is "hair_color".</p>
  1436. <example caption='Hair Color'><![CDATA[
  1437. <field var='hair_color'>
  1438. <value>none</value>
  1439. </field>
  1440. ]]></example>
  1441. </section3>
  1442. <section3 topic='Height' anchor='height'>
  1443. <p>Some people may want to know a person's height. This SHOULD be expressed in centimeters (which can be transformed into other units if necessary by a client).</p>
  1444. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a person's height is "height".</p>
  1445. <example caption='Height'><![CDATA[
  1446. <field var='height'>
  1447. <value>178</value>
  1448. </field>
  1449. ]]></example>
  1450. </section3>
  1451. <section3 topic='Weight' anchor='weight'>
  1452. <p>Yes, it is a sensitive topic, but some people may want to know a person's weight. This SHOULD be expressed in kilograms (which can be transformed into other units if necessary by a client).</p>
  1453. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a person's weight is "weight".</p>
  1454. <example caption='Weight'><![CDATA[
  1455. <field var='weight'>
  1456. <value>75</value>
  1457. </field>
  1458. ]]></example>
  1459. </section3>
  1460. </section2>
  1461. <section2 topic='Extended Personal Data Aspects' anchor='fields-extended'>
  1462. <section3 topic='Areas of Expertise' anchor='expertise'>
  1463. <p>An area of expertise is a subject in which a person has a great deal of knowledge.</p>
  1464. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an area of expertise is "expertise".</p>
  1465. <example caption='Areas of Expertise'><![CDATA[
  1466. <field var='expertise'>
  1467. <value>Jabber</value>
  1468. <value>XMPP</value>
  1469. </field>
  1470. ]]></example>
  1471. </section3>
  1472. <section3 topic='Avatar Data' anchor='avatar_data'>
  1473. <p>An avatar is an often fanciful representation of a user's desired self-image or persona (e.g., in the context of a game). An avatar is usually not intended to be an accurate picture of the user's actual physical appearance (that is handled by the photo_url and photo_data fields).</p>
  1474. <p>An avatar can come in two forms: the avatar data itself, or a URL for a avatar.</p>
  1475. <p>The Data Forms field that represents avatar data is "avatar_data".</p>
  1476. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1477. <example caption='Avatar Data'><![CDATA[
  1478. <field var='avatar_data'>
  1479. <value>base64-encoded-image-data</value>
  1480. </field>
  1481. ]]></example>
  1482. </section3>
  1483. <section3 topic='Clubs' anchor='clubs'>
  1484. <p>Some people are members of clubs or other voluntary organizations.</p>
  1485. <p>The Data Forms field that represents club memberships is "clubs".</p>
  1486. <example caption='Club Memberships'><![CDATA[
  1487. <field var='clubs'>
  1488. <value>DENSA</value>
  1489. </field>
  1490. ]]></example>
  1491. </section3>
  1492. <section3 topic='Dietary Preferences' anchor='dietary_preferences'>
  1493. <p>Some people have dietary preferences (vegan, vegetarian, kosher, peanut allergy, no shellfish, etc.).</p>
  1494. <p>The Data Forms field that represents dietary preferences is "dietary_preferences".</p>
  1495. <example caption='Dietary Preferences'><![CDATA[
  1496. <field var='dietary_preferences'>
  1497. <value>none</value>
  1498. </field>
  1499. ]]></example>
  1500. </section3>
  1501. <section3 topic='Hobbies' anchor='hobby'>
  1502. <p>A hobby is a non-work activity that a person enjoys pursuing. Also called an "avocation".</p>
  1503. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a hobby is "hobby".</p>
  1504. <example caption='Some Hobbies'><![CDATA[
  1505. <field var='hobby'>
  1506. <value>guitar</value>
  1507. <value>songwriting</value>
  1508. <value>blogging</value>
  1509. <value>reading</value>
  1510. <value>hiking</value>
  1511. </field>
  1512. ]]></example>
  1513. </section3>
  1514. <section3 topic='Interests' anchor='interest'>
  1515. <p>An interest a thing that a person cares about or is curious about. It is, generally, less active than a hobby.</p>
  1516. <p>The Data Forms field that represents an interest is "interest".</p>
  1517. <example caption='Some Interests'><![CDATA[
  1518. <field var='interest'>
  1519. <value>history</value>
  1520. <value>baseball</value>
  1521. <value>economics</value>
  1522. </field>
  1523. ]]></example>
  1524. </section3>
  1525. <section3 topic='Languages Known Less Well' anchor='languages_lesswell'>
  1526. <p>Some people know more than one language, but less than well (e.g., the person may not be able to speak fluently). The definition of "less well" is left to the user.</p>
  1527. <p>The value of this field MUST be an abbreviation for a language as specified in &rfc4646;.</p>
  1528. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a language known less that well is "languages_lesswell".</p>
  1529. <example caption='Languages Known Less than Well'><![CDATA[
  1530. <field var='languages_lesswell'>
  1531. <value>cz</value>
  1532. <value>de</value>
  1533. <value>nl</value>
  1534. </field>
  1535. ]]></example>
  1536. </section3>
  1537. <section3 topic='Languages Known Well' anchor='languages_well'>
  1538. <p>Everyone knows at least one language well (e.g., they are able to speak or write the language with a fair degree of fluency). Determination of whether someone knows a language "well" or "fluently" is left to the user.</p>
  1539. <p>The value of this field MUST be an abbreviation for a language as specified in <cite>RFC 4646</cite>.</p>
  1540. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a language known well is "languages_well".</p>
  1541. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1542. <ul>
  1543. <li>LDAP preferredLanguage</li>
  1544. </ul>
  1545. <example caption='Languages Known Well'><![CDATA[
  1546. <field var='languages_well'>
  1547. <value>en</value>
  1548. </field>
  1549. ]]></example>
  1550. </section3>
  1551. <section3 topic='License Plate Number' anchor='car_license_number'>
  1552. <p>Many people own automobiles, which usually have license or registration numbers.</p>
  1553. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a car license or registration number is "car_license_number".</p>
  1554. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1555. <ul>
  1556. <li>LDAP carLicense</li>
  1557. </ul>
  1558. <example caption='License Plate Number'><![CDATA[
  1559. <field var='car_license_number'>
  1560. <value>JABBER</value>
  1561. </field>
  1562. ]]></example>
  1563. </section3>
  1564. <section3 topic='Marital Status' anchor='marital_status'>
  1565. <p>Human beings often get married, sometimes get divorced, become widowed, etc.</p>
  1566. <p>The Data Forms field that represents whether a person's marital status is "marital_status".</p>
  1567. <example caption='Marital Status'><![CDATA[
  1568. <field var='marital_status'>
  1569. <value>married</value>
  1570. </field>
  1571. ]]></example>
  1572. </section3>
  1573. <section3 topic='Myers-Briggs Type Indicator' anchor='mbti'>
  1574. <p>A Myers-Briggs type indicator is four-letter acronym that is a popular way to characterize different personality types.</p>
  1575. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a Myers-Briggs type indicator is "mbti".</p>
  1576. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1577. <ul>
  1578. <li>FOAF myersBriggs</li>
  1579. </ul>
  1580. <example caption='Myers-Briggs Type Indicator'><![CDATA[
  1581. <field var='mbti'>
  1582. <value>INTP</value>
  1583. </field>
  1584. ]]></example>
  1585. </section3>
  1586. <section3 topic='Photo Data' anchor='photo_data'>
  1587. <p>A photo provides a pictorial representation of a person. Sometimes also called a "mugshot".</p>
  1588. <p>A photo can come in two forms: the photo data itself, or a URL for a photo (e.g., the vCard PHOTO element can represent either, while the FOAF depiction and FOAF img can represent only a URL).</p>
  1589. <p>The Data Forms field that represents photo data is "photo_data".</p>
  1590. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1591. <ul>
  1592. <li>vCard PHOTO</li>
  1593. <li>LDAP jpegPhoto</li>
  1594. </ul>
  1595. <example caption='Photo Data'><![CDATA[
  1596. <field var='photo_data'>
  1597. <value>base64-encoded-image-data</value>
  1598. </field>
  1599. ]]></example>
  1600. </section3>
  1601. <section3 topic='Profession' anchor='profession'>
  1602. <p>A profession is what a person does for his or her primary employment. Also known as a "vocation". The allowable or recommended values for this field are not specified.</p>
  1603. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a profession is "profession".</p>
  1604. <example caption='A Profession'><![CDATA[
  1605. <field var='profession'>
  1606. <value>software engineer</value>
  1607. </field>
  1608. ]]></example>
  1609. </section3>
  1610. <section3 topic='Religious Affiliation' anchor='religion'>
  1611. <p>Many people feel affiliated with a religious belief system.</p>
  1612. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a religious affiliation is "religion".</p>
  1613. <example caption='Religious Affiliation'><![CDATA[
  1614. <field var='religion'>
  1615. <value>none</value>
  1616. </field>
  1617. ]]></example>
  1618. </section3>
  1619. <section3 topic='Sexual Orientation' anchor='sexual_orientation'>
  1620. <p>The allowable or recommended values for this field are not specified.</p>
  1621. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a person's sexual orientation is "sexual_orientation".</p>
  1622. <example caption='Sexual Orientation'><![CDATA[
  1623. <field var='sexual_orientation'>
  1624. <value>straight</value>
  1625. </field>
  1626. ]]></example>
  1627. </section3>
  1628. <section3 topic='Smoker' anchor='smoker'>
  1629. <p>Some people smoke tobacco in various forms (cigarettes, cigars, pipes, etc.).</p>
  1630. <p>The Data Forms field that represents whether a person smokes is "smoker".</p>
  1631. <example caption='Smoker'><![CDATA[
  1632. <field var='smoker'>
  1633. <value>no</value>
  1634. </field>
  1635. ]]></example>
  1636. </section3>
  1637. <section3 topic='Wishlist' anchor='wishlist'>
  1638. <p>A wishlist is a list of items that a person would like to receive as gifts.</p>
  1639. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a wishlist is "wishlist".</p>
  1640. <example caption='Wishlist'><![CDATA[
  1641. <field var='wishlist'>
  1642. <value>A Mini Cooper</value>
  1643. </field>
  1644. ]]></example>
  1645. </section3>
  1646. <section3 topic='Zodiac Sign (Chinese)' anchor='zodiac_chinese'>
  1647. <p>A Chinese zodiac sign denotes the type of year in which a person was born according to the Chinese calendar (e.g., the year of the dragon).</p>
  1648. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a Chinese zodiac sign is "zodiac_chinese".</p>
  1649. <example caption='Zodiac Sign (Chinese)'><![CDATA[
  1650. <field var='zodiac_chinese'>
  1651. <value>horse</value>
  1652. </field>
  1653. ]]></example>
  1654. </section3>
  1655. <section3 topic='Zodiac Sign (Western)' anchor='zodiac_western'>
  1656. <p>A Western zodiac sign is that part of the astrological belt under which a person was born; each sign is named after one of the constellations.</p>
  1657. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a Western zodiac sign is "zodiac_western".</p>
  1658. <example caption='Zodiac Sign (Western)'><![CDATA[
  1659. <field var='zodiac_western'>
  1660. <value>Leo</value>
  1661. </field>
  1662. ]]></example>
  1663. </section3>
  1664. </section2>
  1665. <section2 topic='Security Data Aspects' anchor='fields-security'>
  1666. <p>Some people have PGP keys, X.509 certificates, and the like.</p>
  1667. <section3 topic='PGP Key' anchor='pgpkey'>
  1668. <p>The ASCII armored output of a PGP key.</p>
  1669. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a PGP key is "pgpkey".</p>
  1670. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1671. <ul>
  1672. <li>vCard KEY with TYPE of PGP</li>
  1673. </ul>
  1674. <example caption='PGP Key'><![CDATA[
  1675. <field var='pgpkey'>
  1676. <value>
  1677. -----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
  1678. Version: GnuPG v1.2.4 (Darwin)
  1679. mQGiBEGSeUQRBADTT8NqGpxDQ1GjmAJBDNET0blyb1LF6exYLxydX+hzcooE5WxP
  1680. Zdo5Xx0RrLYlKmmcKv0Z8cG/kei2pkS05h/oqluphGmzMBIeC/ox22z87PKpVDfj
  1681. OEYQOZqhqdFI+KRIa4M89CQOO1N5V2KlX9GaNjxRearKvLgsoeTzpPtybwCgl91i
  1682. SqQnry1YV+PFOjRcDT7cX+UD/2JxXU5d1Z1WZf7ttM3QjSaPc9CA4fS+axinRkn/
  1683. IbRJ/Lj8Tz+Vb4kBbBhmFG8JCoRtj2J8bsDdaFCh7nHqT2u4oXy0NJSCKrDRBcuL
  1684. bEQfasT/cuBXIM2A7nB1UtlUCYXnINxakYLIsW9BvvFN935FhZ81EJvLW34W2Mf7
  1685. Y+9ZA/0adScaI05UUE5RRcZSiXs8/p+R6SeaW2gjS5beL5Wv6ExRlDe92rGqrjtN
  1686. PmBRiDiVBSoYlqOepBZk+wM+/B4WMsmUFVeXsXWjWMlghyyni2rI1Z2v1UH8KBKm
  1687. 259k7SlU/BbnEAHIzuHPSQHJNUX+YqWArz1v5tDcQn7L1Wo7PbRAUGV0ZXIgU2Fp
  1688. bnQtQW5kcmUgKHhtcHA6c3RwZXRlckBqYWJiZXIub3JnKSA8c3RwZXRlckBqYWJi
  1689. ZXIub3JnPoheBBMRAgAeBQJBknlEAhsDBgsJCAcDAgMVAgMDFgIBAh4BAheAAAoJ
  1690. EFmFiWTXBRKsfeQAoJdO0PvP1Mi/kJ9U1zVpa4GPpXYCAJ9oFjonfr+Z3ZTefjSb
  1691. tZpE2mny57kCDQRBknlzEAgAisWlkK6daVjrxouZK9KvX8tt3CKVse4CY52Lq7xi
  1692. dtEAhDcXX9SgTnlxgrcCnBipj/OMi/B2M0U88qv3TcsZ0dWZt7H4FnHJvU4xloK8
  1693. qRkJ7xa6gCEoPAc7ESdr//6J/eEvWMqixstOUyfRg2AQp/eSHX0Cl/TQImRVZbh6
  1694. HYCehrqpErAnz0VY8nvun3709LgvIMUvKrnV7lF9wOuuhWCK9IYdpmgoD4d/Gr4t
  1695. ZVuE1jYN4tBLyQXtJDAR/UvKHEiXUAhsfXOtfCUQV5MaxM6YQce63BGl05kS7oLH
  1696. Sx+KYOX1vEi3k1OFfH5CpqYaxmfhSzdyz7Hhdsl+IbkhzwAECwf/YQfpx4z9dnJn
  1697. 3ePrZhz5SI4KjdbOCmqhLFd8aVoQ9BCriePH3kPjjoE9Qz+0NlFqzuG4/tkZkAok
  1698. BA0GqYE4XXgvpwGpK95mlUvxDOowu0fLVQA8NfpU3U7YItZkfAPZ2M+PnmayRILi
  1699. 0yBmm1taVllCD2mc2vhsMRUoD1DUworSzQuTG9YlQ89Q2/1LsoQzYjBz9XIfYV4A
  1700. MPr/PKPkKy3D7BYHi/DOnkcP9hLXJSCjgV5TpuWuCVX9aYU2Yb7BfY1OFORBCUaV
  1701. B1YLAPtXqfqjz25pIQPDEUbpKzhEO7xNU4EPT8ZsSfqqOd3aMet8McieRfMd+VIe
  1702. 4J1OUIg1oYhJBBgRAgAJBQJBknlzAhsMAAoJEFmFiWTXBRKs/GgAn0R63qTEQd/e
  1703. XhK8hFkPvXjudl7xAJ95+2fAHfmHheZJVaO8VaJiL54Tvw==
  1704. =ZRIc
  1705. -----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
  1706. </value>
  1707. </field>
  1708. ]]></example>
  1709. </section3>
  1710. <section3 topic='PGP Key Fingerprint' anchor='pgp_fingerprint'>
  1711. <p>The fingerprint (hashed value) of a PGP key.</p>
  1712. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a PGP fingerprint is "pgp_fingerprint".</p>
  1713. <example caption='PGP Fingerprint'><![CDATA[
  1714. <field var='pgp_fingerprint'>
  1715. <value>E5CA EAE7 C8D6 CFE2 6D7A 8653 5985 8964 D705 12AC</value>
  1716. </field>
  1717. ]]></example>
  1718. </section3>
  1719. <section3 topic='PGP Key ID' anchor='pgpkey_id'>
  1720. <p>The ID of a PGP key.</p>
  1721. <p>The Data Forms field that represents a PGP key ID is "pgpkey_id".</p>
  1722. <example caption='PGP Key ID'><![CDATA[
  1723. <field var='pgpkey_id'>
  1724. <value>D70512AC</value>
  1725. </field>
  1726. ]]></example>
  1727. </section3>
  1728. <section3 topic='X.509 Fingerprint (MD5)' anchor='x509_fingerprint_md5'>
  1729. <p>The fingerprint of an X.509 certificate, hashed using MD5.</p>
  1730. <p>The Data Forms field representing such a value is "x509_fingerprint_md5".</p>
  1731. <example caption='X.509 Fingerprint (MD5)'><![CDATA[
  1732. <field var='x509_fingerprint_md5'>
  1733. <value>5D 41 20 54 7C 90 49 A1 78 36 07 29 75 9B A7 D0</value>
  1734. </field>
  1735. ]]></example>
  1736. </section3>
  1737. <section3 topic='X.509 Fingerprint (SHA-1)' anchor='x509_fingerprint_sha1'>
  1738. <p>The fingerprint of an X.509 certificate, hashed using SHA-1.</p>
  1739. <p>The Data Forms field representing such a value is "x509_fingerprint_sha1".</p>
  1740. <example caption='X.509 Fingerprint (SHA-1)'><![CDATA[
  1741. <field var='x509_fingerprint_sha1'>
  1742. <value>C3 88 33 27 F3 47 3B 8B 07 71 3E 96 44 A7 EE E2 E0 50 4A 5B</value>
  1743. </field>
  1744. ]]></example>
  1745. </section3>
  1746. </section2>
  1747. <section2 topic='Personal Favorites' anchor='fields-favorites'>
  1748. <p>Most people have favorite movies, authors, TV shows, musical artists, foods, games, etc.</p>
  1749. <section3 topic='Favorite Authors' anchor='fav_authors'>
  1750. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite authors is "fav_authors".</p>
  1751. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1752. <example caption='Favorite Authors'><![CDATA[
  1753. <field var='fav_authors'>
  1754. <value>Jacob Bronowski</value>
  1755. <value>Friedrich Nietzsche</value>
  1756. <value>Carroll Quigley</value>
  1757. <value>Yevgeny Zamyatin</value>
  1758. </field>
  1759. ]]></example>
  1760. </section3>
  1761. <section3 topic='Favorite Athletes' anchor='fav_athletes'>
  1762. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite athletes is "fav_athletes".</p>
  1763. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1764. <example caption='Favorite Athletes'><![CDATA[
  1765. <field var='fav_athletes'>
  1766. <value>Lance Armstrong</value>
  1767. <value>Andre Agassiz</value>
  1768. </field>
  1769. ]]></example>
  1770. </section3>
  1771. <section3 topic='Favorite Beverages' anchor='favorite_beverages'>
  1772. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite beverages is "favorite_beverages".</p>
  1773. <p>This field maps to:</p>
  1774. <ul>
  1775. <li>LDAP drink</li>
  1776. <li>LDAP favoriteDrink</li>
  1777. </ul>
  1778. <example caption='Favorite Beverages'><![CDATA[
  1779. <field var='favorite_beverages'>
  1780. <value>Guinness</value>
  1781. </field>
  1782. ]]></example>
  1783. </section3>
  1784. <section3 topic='Favorite Charities' anchor='fav_charities'>
  1785. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite charities is "fav_charities".</p>
  1786. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1787. <example caption='Favorite Charities'><![CDATA[
  1788. <field var='fav_charities'>
  1789. <value>Institute for Justice</value>
  1790. <value>PERC</value>
  1791. </field>
  1792. ]]></example>
  1793. </section3>
  1794. <section3 topic='Favorite Chatrooms' anchor='fav_chatrooms'>
  1795. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite chatrooms is "fav_chatrooms".</p>
  1796. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1797. <example caption='Favorite Chatrooms'><![CDATA[
  1798. <field var='fav_chatrooms'>
  1799. <value>jabber@conference.jabber.org</value>
  1800. <value>jdev@conference.jabber.org</value>
  1801. </field>
  1802. ]]></example>
  1803. </section3>
  1804. <section3 topic='Favorite Drinks' anchor='fav_drinks'>
  1805. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite drinks is "fav_drinks".</p>
  1806. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1807. <example caption='Favorite Drinks'><![CDATA[
  1808. <field var='fav_drinks'>
  1809. <value>Guinness</value>
  1810. </field>
  1811. ]]></example>
  1812. </section3>
  1813. <section3 topic='Favorite Foods' anchor='fav_foods'>
  1814. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite foods is "fav_foods".</p>
  1815. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1816. <example caption='Favorite Foods'><![CDATA[
  1817. <field var='fav_foods'>
  1818. <value>Thai</value>
  1819. <value>Mexican</value>
  1820. <value>Italian</value>
  1821. </field>
  1822. ]]></example>
  1823. </section3>
  1824. <section3 topic='Favorite Games' anchor='fav_games'>
  1825. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite games is "fav_games".</p>
  1826. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1827. <example caption='Favorite Games'><![CDATA[
  1828. <field var='fav_games'>
  1829. <value>chess</value>
  1830. </field>
  1831. ]]></example>
  1832. </section3>
  1833. <section3 topic='Favorite Movies' anchor='fav_movies'>
  1834. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite movies is "fav_movies".</p>
  1835. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1836. <example caption='Favorite Movies'><![CDATA[
  1837. <field var='fav_movies'>
  1838. <value>In Search of Bobby Fischer</value>
  1839. <value>Strictly Ballroom</value>
  1840. <value>The Truth About Cats and Dogs</value>
  1841. <value>Ray</value>
  1842. </field>
  1843. ]]></example>
  1844. </section3>
  1845. <section3 topic='Favorite Music' anchor='fav_music'>
  1846. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite music is "fav_music".</p>
  1847. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1848. <example caption='Favorite Music'><![CDATA[
  1849. <field var='fav_music'>
  1850. <value>J.S. Bach</value>
  1851. <value>Duke Ellington</value>
  1852. <value>Mellow Candle</value>
  1853. <value>Yes</value>
  1854. </field>
  1855. ]]></example>
  1856. </section3>
  1857. <section3 topic='Favorite Quotes' anchor='fav_quotes'>
  1858. <p>A quote is a phrase or saying that a person identifies with in some way. According to the 2004 Pew Internet survey on instant messaging, quotes represent the most popular item to include in online profiles on major consumer-oriented instant messaging services.</p>
  1859. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite quotes is "fav_quotes".</p>
  1860. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1861. <example caption='Favorite Quotes'><![CDATA[
  1862. <field var='fav_quotes'>
  1863. <value>I am large, I contain multitudes.</value>
  1864. <value>&quot;Think like a man of action, act like a man of thought.&quot; --Henri Bergson</value>
  1865. <value>One crowded hour of glorious life is worth an age without a name.</value>
  1866. </field>
  1867. ]]></example>
  1868. </section3>
  1869. <section3 topic='Favorite Sports Teams' anchor='fav_teams'>
  1870. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite sports teams is "fav_teams".</p>
  1871. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1872. <example caption='Favorite Sports Teams'><![CDATA[
  1873. <field var='fav_teams'>
  1874. <value>New York Yankees</value>
  1875. <value>Colorado Rockies</value>
  1876. </field>
  1877. ]]></example>
  1878. </section3>
  1879. <section3 topic='Favorite TV Shows' anchor='fav_tv'>
  1880. <p>The Data Forms field that represents favorite TV shows is "fav_tv".</p>
  1881. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1882. <example caption='Favorite TV Shows'><![CDATA[
  1883. <field var='fav_tv'>
  1884. <value>Antiques Road Show</value>
  1885. </field>
  1886. ]]></example>
  1887. </section3>
  1888. </section2>
  1889. <section2 topic='Personal History' anchor='fields-history'>
  1890. <section3 topic='Places Lived' anchor='places_lived'>
  1891. <p>Some people move around a lot.</p>
  1892. <p>The Data Forms field that represents places lived is "places_lived".</p>
  1893. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1894. <example caption='Places Lived'><![CDATA[
  1895. <field var='places_lived'>
  1896. <value>Denver, Colorado, USA</value>
  1897. <value>New Hope, Pennsylvania, USA</value>
  1898. <value>Maplewood, New Jersey, USA</value>
  1899. <value>Atlanta, Georgia, USA</value>
  1900. <value>Fairfax, Virginia, USA</value>
  1901. <value>Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic</value>
  1902. <value>New York City</value>
  1903. <value>Readfield, Maine, USA</value>
  1904. <value>Sea Cliff, NY, USA</value>
  1905. </field>
  1906. ]]></example>
  1907. </section3>
  1908. <section3 topic='Schools Attended' anchor='schools'>
  1909. <p>The Data Forms field that represents schools attended is "schools".</p>
  1910. <p>This field does not map to data in vCard or any other profile representation format.</p>
  1911. <example caption='Schools Attended'><![CDATA[
  1912. <field var='schools'>
  1913. <value>Columbia University</value>
  1914. <value>American Renaissance School</value>
  1915. <value>Maranacook Community School</value>
  1916. </field>
  1917. ]]></example>
  1918. </section3>
  1919. </section2>
  1920. </section1>
  1921. <section1 topic='Security Considerations' anchor='security'>
  1922. <p>Profile data can be personally significant and even security critical. Due care should be taken in determining who shall have access to such information. In particular, an entity SHOULD ensure that its public profile contains only information that it deems safe to be world-readable, SHOULD ensure that any pubsub node it may create for profile data has an access model of "presence" or "roster", and SHOULD NOT publish private or restricted data except to such a pubsub node.</p>
  1923. </section1>
  1924. <section1 topic='IANA Considerations' anchor='iana'>
  1925. <p>This document requires no interaction with &IANA;.</p>
  1926. </section1>
  1927. <section1 topic='XMPP Registrar Considerations' anchor='registrar'>
  1928. <section2 topic='Protocol Namespaces' anchor='ns'>
  1929. <p>Until this specification advances to a status of Draft, its associated namespace shall be "urn:xmpp:tmp:profile"; upon advancement of this specification, the &REGISTRAR; shall issue a permanent namespace in accordance with the process defined in Section 4 of &xep0053;.</p>
  1930. </section2>
  1931. <section2 topic='Field Standardization' anchor='registrar-formtype'>
  1932. <p>To follow.</p>
  1933. </section2>
  1934. </section1>
  1935. <section1 topic='XML Schema' anchor='schema'>
  1936. <code><![CDATA[
  1937. <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
  1938. <xs:schema
  1939. xmlns:xs='http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema'
  1940. targetNamespace='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'
  1941. xmlns='urn:xmpp:tmp:profile'
  1942. elementFormDefault='qualified'>
  1943. <xs:import
  1944. namespace='jabber:x:data'
  1945. schemaLocation='http://www.xmpp.org/schemas/x-data.xsd'/>
  1946. <xs:element name='profile'>
  1947. <xs:complexType>
  1948. <xs:sequence xmlns:data='jabber:x:data'>
  1949. <xs:element ref='data:x'/>
  1950. </xs:sequence>
  1951. </xs:complexType>
  1952. </xs:schema>
  1953. ]]></code>
  1954. </section1>
  1955. </xep>