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XEP-0001: change "Draft" to "Stable"

Signed-off-by: Sam Whited <sam@samwhited.com>
master
Sam Whited 1 year ago committed by Jonas Schäfer
parent
commit
05916875ec
  1. 55
      xep-0001.xml

55
xep-0001.xml

@ -22,6 +22,12 @@ @@ -22,6 +22,12 @@
&stpeter;
&dcridland;
&ralphm;
<revision>
<version>1.24.0</version>
<date>2021-08-24</date>
<initials>ssw</initials>
<remark><p>Change "Draft" to "Stable".</p></remark>
</revision>
<revision>
<version>1.23.1</version>
<date>2019-10-19</date>
@ -218,8 +224,8 @@ @@ -218,8 +224,8 @@
<li>The developer submits a specification to the &EDITOR; and agrees to transfer ownership over the protocol (but not implementations thereof) to the XSF.</li>
<li>If the specification is accepted by the XMPP Council, it is published as an Experimental XEP.</li>
<li>The XEP undergoes extensive community review on the XSF's open discussion lists and is implemented experimentally in XMPP clients, servers, and libraries.</li>
<li>If the protocol fills an important need, meets with rough consensus, and is (preferably) implemented in running code, the XMPP Council will formally review it and vote on advancing it to a status of Draft.</li>
<li>While the XEP is in the Draft state, the protocol may be refined based on further discussion and implementation experience.</li>
<li>If the protocol fills an important need, meets with rough consensus, and is (preferably) implemented in running code, the XMPP Council will formally review it and vote on advancing it to a status of Stable.</li>
<li>While the XEP is in the Stable state, the protocol may be refined based on further discussion and implementation experience.</li>
<li>If the protocol is deemed stable after at least six months (and normally more) of further implementation and deployment experience, the XSF then considers advancement of the XEP to a status of Final.</li>
</ol>
<p>Other types of XEP follow modified variants through the same essential path.</p>
@ -244,7 +250,7 @@ @@ -244,7 +250,7 @@
<p>A <span class='ref'>Standards Track XEP</span> defines one of the following:</p>
<ol>
<li>A wire protocol intended to be used as a standard part of XMPP technologies.
<note>A protocol defined in a Standards Track XEP is not considered a full standard of the XMPP Standards Foundation until it achieves a status of Final within the standards process defined herein (a Standards Track XEP that has achieved a status of Draft may be referred to as a Draft Standard; a Standards Track XEP that has a status of Experimental must not be referred to as a standard, but instead should be referred to as a work in progress).</note>
<note>A protocol defined in a Standards Track XEP is not considered a full standard of the XMPP Standards Foundation until it achieves a status of Final within the standards process defined herein (a Standards Track XEP that has achieved a status of Stable may be referred to as a Stable Standard; a Standards Track XEP that has a status of Experimental must not be referred to as a standard, but instead should be referred to as a work in progress).</note>
</li>
<li>A protocol suite that determines conformance requirements (e.g., &xep0270;).</li>
</ol>
@ -303,7 +309,7 @@ @@ -303,7 +309,7 @@
<p>If an Experimental XEP is inactive (i.e., no updated versions are published) for a period of twelve (12) months, the XMPP Extensions Editor shall automatically change the status of the XEP to Deferred unless it is in the queue of XEPs under active consideration for advancement by the Approving Body; upon submission of an updated version, the XMPP Extensions Editor shall change the status back to Experimental.</p>
</section1>
<section1 topic='Proposal Process' anchor='proposal'>
<p>An Experimental (or Deferred) XEP may be proposed to the Approving Body for advancement to Draft (Standards Track XEPs) or Active (Historical, Informational, and Procedural XEPs). This can be requested from the Approving Body on the Standards list by, or in collaboration with, the XEP author. In case the XEP has been abandoned by its author(s), any other individual can propose advancement in their stead. The Approving Body will then require a Document Shepherd to take on responsibilities on behalf of the XEP author during the proposal and approval processes. The Approving Body must agree that the XEP is ready to be considered for advancement. Once the Approving Body so agrees, it shall instruct the XMPP Extensions Editor to (1) change the status of the XEP from Experimental (or Deferred) to Proposed and (2) issue a Last Call for open discussion on the Standards list. The Last Call shall expire not less than fourteen (14) days after the date of issue.</p>
<p>An Experimental (or Deferred) XEP may be proposed to the Approving Body for advancement to Stable (Standards Track XEPs) or Active (Historical, Informational, and Procedural XEPs). This can be requested from the Approving Body on the Standards list by, or in collaboration with, the XEP author. In case the XEP has been abandoned by its author(s), any other individual can propose advancement in their stead. The Approving Body will then require a Document Shepherd to take on responsibilities on behalf of the XEP author during the proposal and approval processes. The Approving Body must agree that the XEP is ready to be considered for advancement. Once the Approving Body so agrees, it shall instruct the XMPP Extensions Editor to (1) change the status of the XEP from Experimental (or Deferred) to Proposed and (2) issue a Last Call for open discussion on the Standards list. The Last Call shall expire not less than fourteen (14) days after the date of issue.</p>
<p>Once the consensus of the Standards SIG has been incorporated into the XEP and all issues of substance raised during the Last Call have been addressed by the XEP author or Document Shepherd, the XMPP Extensions Editor shall formally propose a specific revision of the XEP to the Approving Body for its vote. If necessary, the XMPP Extensions Editor may, at his discretion and in consultation with the Approving Body, extend the Last Call or issue a new Last Call if the XEP requires further discussion.</p>
</section1>
<section1 topic='Approval Process' anchor='approval'>
@ -326,17 +332,17 @@ @@ -326,17 +332,17 @@
+--> Deferred +--> Rejected
| | |
| | |
Experimental --+-> Proposed ----> Draft ----> Final
Experimental --+-> Proposed ----> Stable ---> Final
^ | | |
+----------------+ | |
+-----------+---> Deprecated
|
+--> Obsolete
</code>
<p>After an XMPP Extension Protocol has been accepted for publication by the XMPP Council and before it is proposed for advancement to a status of Draft (or retracted or deferred), it shall have a status of Experimental. Publication as an Experimental XEP does not indicate approval of the protocol by the XMPP Council or the broader XMPP community.</p>
<p><em>Note: An Experimental specification is a work in progress and may undergo significant modification before advancing to a status of Draft. While implementation of an Experimental protocol is encouraged in order to determine the feasibility of the proposed solution, it is not recommended for such implementations to be included in the primary release for a software product (as opposed to an experimental branch).</em></p>
<p>The ideal path is for a Standards Track XEP is to be advanced by the XMPP Council from Proposed to Draft to Final (the criteria for this advancement are described in the following paragraphs). However, an Experimental XEP shall be assigned a status of Deferred if it has not been updated in twelve (12) months (e.g., because of a lack of interest or because it depends on other specifications that have yet to move forward). In addition, rather than being advanced from Proposed to Draft, a Standards Track XEP may be voted to a status of Rejected if the XMPP Council deems it unacceptable. (Note that if a XEP is Deferred, the XMPP Extensions Editor may at some point re-assign it to Experimental status, and that, even if a XEP is Rejected, it is retained in source control and on the XMPP Standards Foundation website for future reference.) Finally, (only) a XEP author may voluntarily remove an Experimental XEP from further consideration, resulting in a status of Retracted.</p>
<p>In order for a Standards Track XEP to advance from Proposed to Draft, it must:</p>
<p>After an XMPP Extension Protocol has been accepted for publication by the XMPP Council and before it is proposed for advancement to a status of Stable (or retracted or deferred), it shall have a status of Experimental. Publication as an Experimental XEP does not indicate approval of the protocol by the XMPP Council or the broader XMPP community.</p>
<p><em>Note: An Experimental specification is a work in progress and may undergo significant modification before advancing to a status of Stable. While implementation of an Experimental protocol is encouraged in order to determine the feasibility of the proposed solution, it is not recommended for such implementations to be included in the primary release for a software product (as opposed to an experimental branch).</em></p>
<p>The ideal path is for a Standards Track XEP is to be advanced by the XMPP Council from Proposed to Stable to Final (the criteria for this advancement are described in the following paragraphs). However, an Experimental XEP shall be assigned a status of Deferred if it has not been updated in twelve (12) months (e.g., because of a lack of interest or because it depends on other specifications that have yet to move forward). In addition, rather than being advanced from Proposed to Stable, a Standards Track XEP may be voted to a status of Rejected if the XMPP Council deems it unacceptable. (Note that if a XEP is Deferred, the XMPP Extensions Editor may at some point re-assign it to Experimental status, and that, even if a XEP is Rejected, it is retained in source control and on the XMPP Standards Foundation website for future reference.) Finally, (only) a XEP author may voluntarily remove an Experimental XEP from further consideration, resulting in a status of Retracted.</p>
<p>In order for a Standards Track XEP to advance from Proposed to Stable, it must:</p>
<ol>
<li>fill known gaps in XMPP technologies or deficiencies with existing protocols</li>
<li>be clearly described and accurately documented so that it can be understood and implemented by interested and knowledgeable members of the XMPP developer community</li>
@ -346,10 +352,10 @@ Experimental --+-> Proposed ----> Draft ----> Final @@ -346,10 +352,10 @@ Experimental --+-> Proposed ----> Draft ----> Final
<li>be formally defined by an XML schema</li>
<li>receive the requisite votes from the XMPP Council</li>
</ol>
<p>Elevation to Draft status (version 1.0) is a major advancement for the XEP, indicating a strong sense on the part of the XMPP Council and XMPP developer community that the specification will be of lasting value.</p>
<p><em>Note: Once an XMPP Extension Protocol has been advanced to a status of Draft, it is expected that the specification will be the basis for widespread implementation and for deployment in production environments. As a result of such implementation and deployment experience, the protocol may be subject to modification, including changes that are backwards-incompatible. Although such backwards-incompatible modifications shall be avoided if at all possible, deployment of a Draft protocol in mission-critical application may not be advisable.</em></p>
<p>Any changes to a Draft XEP that could reasonably be construed as material must be provisionally published, announced and discussed on the Standards mailing list, and formally approved by the XMPP Council before being officially published at the canonical URL for the XEP. Ultimate authority for Draft XEPs rests with the XMPP Council, which can at its discretion demand the reversal of any changes made by the XMPP Extensions Editor or the XEP author while the XEP is in the Draft state.</p>
<p>In order for a XEP to advance from Draft status to Final status (version 2.0), it must be shown to be stable and well-received by the XMPP developer community. Before presenting a Draft standard to the XMPP Council for consideration as a Final standard, the XMPP Extensions Editor shall issue a Call for Experience on the Standards list so that feedback can be gathered from those who have implemented the Draft standard (the Call for Experience shall expire not less than fourteen (14) days after the date of issue, and shall not be issued until at least six (6) months have passed since advancement to Draft). In addition, at least two implementations of the XEP must exist, at least one of which must be free software (in accordance with the &GPL; or &LGPL;) or open-source software (in accordance with the definition provided by &OSI;). Until two implementations are produced, a Standards Track XEP shall retain a status of Draft. Once (1) two implementations have been presented to the XMPP Council, (2) feedback provided during the Call for Experience has been incorporated into the XEP, and (3) the XEP has been fully checked for accuracy, the status of the XEP may be changed to Final upon a vote of the Council.</p>
<p>Elevation to Stable status (version 1.0) is a major advancement for the XEP, indicating a strong sense on the part of the XMPP Council and XMPP developer community that the specification will be of lasting value.</p>
<p><em>Note: Once an XMPP Extension Protocol has been advanced to a status of Stable, it is expected that the specification will be the basis for widespread implementation and for deployment in production environments. As a result of such implementation and deployment experience, the protocol may be subject to modification, including changes that are backwards-incompatible. Although such backwards-incompatible modifications shall be avoided if at all possible, deployment of a Stable protocol in mission-critical application may not be advisable.</em></p>
<p>Any changes to a Stable XEP that could reasonably be construed as material must be provisionally published, announced and discussed on the Standards mailing list, and formally approved by the XMPP Council before being officially published at the canonical URL for the XEP. Ultimate authority for Stable XEPs rests with the XMPP Council, which can at its discretion demand the reversal of any changes made by the XMPP Extensions Editor or the XEP author while the XEP is in the Stable state.</p>
<p>In order for a XEP to advance from Stable status to Final status (version 2.0), it must be shown to be stable and well-received by the XMPP developer community. Before presenting a Stable standard to the XMPP Council for consideration as a Final standard, the XMPP Extensions Editor shall issue a Call for Experience on the Standards list so that feedback can be gathered from those who have implemented the Stable standard (the Call for Experience shall expire not less than fourteen (14) days after the date of issue, and shall not be issued until at least six (6) months have passed since advancement to Stable). In addition, at least two implementations of the XEP must exist, at least one of which must be free software (in accordance with the &GPL; or &LGPL;) or open-source software (in accordance with the definition provided by &OSI;). Until two implementations are produced, a Standards Track XEP shall retain a status of Stable. Once (1) two implementations have been presented to the XMPP Council, (2) feedback provided during the Call for Experience has been incorporated into the XEP, and (3) the XEP has been fully checked for accuracy, the status of the XEP may be changed to Final upon a vote of the Council.</p>
<p><em>Note: Once an XMPP Extension Protocol has been advanced to a status of Final, every effort shall be made to limit the scope of modifications; in particular, backwards-incompatible changes shall not be made. However, limited modifications may be made as long as they are optional, backwards-compatible extensions rather than modifications to the core protocol itself. Therefore, a Final protocol is safe for deployment in mission-critical applications.</em></p>
<p>A Standards Track XEP that has been advanced to a status of Final may be superseded by a future XEP approved by the XMPP Council. In such cases, the status of the earlier XEP shall be changed to Deprecated, possibly with an expiration date assigned by the XMPP Council (see the <link url='#expiration'>Expiration Dates</link> section below). After a reasonable period of time or upon the passing of the expiration date, the status of the XEP shall be changed to Obsolete.</p>
</section2>
@ -372,24 +378,27 @@ Experimental ----> Proposed ----> Active @@ -372,24 +378,27 @@ Experimental ----> Proposed ----> Active
</code>
<p>Because such XEPs do not seek to define standard protocols, in general they are less controversial and tend to proceed from Proposed to Active without controversy on a vote of the XMPP Council. However, some of these XEPs may be remanded from the Council to the XEP author and/or XMPP Extensions Editor for revision in order to be suitable for advancement from Proposed to Active (e.g., documentation of protocols in use must be accurate and describe any existing security concerns). As with Standards Track XEPs, the XEP author may retract such a XEP when it is Experimental, and the Council may reject such a XEP when it is Proposed.</p>
<p>Once approved, Historical, Informational, and Procedural XEPs will have a status of Active. Such a XEP may be replaced by a new XEP on the same or a similar topic, thus rendering the earlier XEP out of date; in such cases, the earlier XEP shall be assigned a status of Deprecated (and eventually Obsolete) with a note specifying the superseding XEP.</p>
<p>The XMPP Council may, at its discretion, decide to convert an Historical XEP into a Standards Track XEP if the protocol defined in the XEP has been in long use, is deemed stable and uncontroversial, and is unlikely to be superseded by a newer protocol. The Historical XEP shall be treated in the same way as a Standards Track XEP that has a status of Experimental, beginning with the <link url="#proposal">Proposal Process</link>. If after the Last Call and voting by the XMPP Council the XEP is approved for advancement on the standards track, its type shall be changed to Standards Track and its status shall be changed to Draft.</p>
<p>The XMPP Council may, at its discretion, decide to convert an Historical XEP into a Standards Track XEP if the protocol defined in the XEP has been in long use, is deemed stable and uncontroversial, and is unlikely to be superseded by a newer protocol. The Historical XEP shall be treated in the same way as a Standards Track XEP that has a status of Experimental, beginning with the <link url="#proposal">Proposal Process</link>. If after the Last Call and voting by the XMPP Council the XEP is approved for advancement on the standards track, its type shall be changed to Standards Track and its status shall be changed to Stable.</p>
</section2>
</section1>
<section1 topic='Summary of XEP States' anchor='states'>
<p>The possible states for a XEP are summarized in the following sections.</p>
<section2 topic='Experimental' anchor='states-Experimental'>
<p>A XEP of any type is in the Experimental state after it has been accepted by the XMPP Council and published by the XMPP Standards Foundation but before it has advanced within the standards process to a state of Active or Draft.</p>
<p><em>Note: An Experimental specification is a work in progress and may undergo significant modification before advancing to a status of Draft. While implementation of an Experimental protocol is encouraged in order to determine the feasibility of the proposed solution, it is not recommended for such implementations to be included in the primary release for a software product (as opposed to an experimental branch).</em></p>
<p>A XEP of any type is in the Experimental state after it has been accepted by the XMPP Council and published by the XMPP Standards Foundation but before it has advanced within the standards process to a state of Active or Stable.</p>
<p><em>Note: An Experimental specification is a work in progress and may undergo significant modification before advancing to a status of Stable. While implementation of an Experimental protocol is encouraged in order to determine the feasibility of the proposed solution, it is not recommended for such implementations to be included in the primary release for a software product (as opposed to an experimental branch).</em></p>
</section2>
<section2 topic='Proposed' anchor='states-Proposed'>
<p>A XEP of any type is in the Proposed state while it is in Last Call or under consideration by the XMPP Council for advancement from Experimental to Draft or Active.</p>
<p>A XEP of any type is in the Proposed state while it is in Last Call or under consideration by the XMPP Council for advancement from Experimental to Stable or Active.</p>
</section2>
<section2 topic='Draft' anchor='states-Draft'>
<p>A Standards Track XEP is in the Draft state after it has undergone extensive discussion and technical review on the Standards list and has been voted forward on the standards track by the XMPP Council.</p>
<p><em>Note: Once an XMPP Extension Protocol has been advanced to a status of Draft, it is expected that the specification will be basis for widespread implementation and for deployment in production environments. As a result of such implementation and deployment experience, the protocol may be subject to modification, including changes that are backwards-incompatible. Although such backwards-incompatible modifications shall be avoided if at all possible, deployment of a Draft protocol in mission-critical application may not be advisable.</em></p>
<p><em>Note: In previous versions of the XSF process the "Stable" status was called "Draft". This led to wide spread confusion about the stability of the protocol so the status was renamed to better reflect the intent.</em></p>
</section2>
<section2 topic='Stable' anchor='states-Stable'>
<p>A Standards Track XEP is in the Stable state after it has undergone extensive discussion and technical review on the Standards list and has been voted forward on the standards track by the XMPP Council.</p>
<p><em>Note: Once an XMPP Extension Protocol has been advanced to a status of Stable, it is expected that the specification will be basis for widespread implementation and for deployment in production environments. As a result of such implementation and deployment experience, the protocol may be subject to modification, including changes that are backwards-incompatible. Although such backwards-incompatible modifications shall be avoided if at all possible, deployment of a Stable protocol in mission-critical application may not be advisable.</em></p>
</section2>
<section2 topic='Final' anchor='states-Final'>
<p>A Standards Track XEP is in the Final state after it has been in the Draft state for at least six (6) months, has been implemented in at least two separate codebases, and has been voted forward on the standards track by the XMPP Council.</p>
<p>A Standards Track XEP is in the Final state after it has been in the Stable state for at least six (6) months, has been implemented in at least two separate codebases, and has been voted forward on the standards track by the XMPP Council.</p>
<p><em>Note: Once an XMPP Extension Protocol has been advanced to a status of Final, every effort shall be made to limit the scope of modifications; in particular, backwards-incompatible changes shall not be made. However, limited modifications may be made as long as they are optional, backwards-compatible extensions rather than modifications to the core protocol itself. Therefore, a Final protocol is safe for deployment in mission-critical applications.</em></p>
</section2>
<section2 topic='Active' anchor='states-Active'>
@ -420,17 +429,17 @@ Experimental ----> Proposed ----> Active @@ -420,17 +429,17 @@ Experimental ----> Proposed ----> Active
<section1 topic='Expiration Dates' anchor='expiration'>
<p>In rare cases, a protocol enhancement may be accepted as an interim solution, especially when it is recognized that expected future improvements in technology or the underlying XMPP protocols will make possible a much better solution to the problem at hand (e.g., a better protocol for user avatars may be contingent upon the development of a robust protocol for publish/subscribe functionality). In such cases, a XEP may be approved provisionally and be assigned an expiration date.</p>
<p>The exact form of such an expiration date shall be left up to the discretion of the XMPP Council. However, the preferred form is to assign an expiration date of six (6) months in the future, at which time the XMPP Council must re-affirm the status of the XEP and, if desired, extend the expiration date for another six (6) months. Although this process may continue indefinitely (although that is unlikely), it has the virtue of forcing the XMPP Council and XMPP developer community to re-examine the provisional protocol on a fairly regular basis in the light of technological changes. Alternatively, a XEP may be assigned a "soft" expiration date: that is, the XEP will expire when an expected future protocol comes into existence, whenever that may be. In either case, the status of the XEP shall be changed to Deprecated when it expires.</p>
<p>In addition, an expiration date may be assigned when the status of a XEP is changed from Final (or, potentially, Draft) to Deprecated. In this case, the expiration date applies to the date when the XEP is expected to change from Deprecated to Obsolete. These dates may be flexible; however it is expected that they will follow the same six-month rule as provisional protocol enhancements.</p>
<p>In addition, an expiration date may be assigned when the status of a XEP is changed from Final (or, potentially, Stable) to Deprecated. In this case, the expiration date applies to the date when the XEP is expected to change from Deprecated to Obsolete. These dates may be flexible; however it is expected that they will follow the same six-month rule as provisional protocol enhancements.</p>
</section1>
<section1 topic='Security Considerations' anchor='security'>
<p>Every XMPP Extension Protocol specification must contain a section entitled "Security Considerations", detailing security concerns or features related to the proposal; in particular, a Standards Track XEP should list the security threats that the protocol addresses and does not address, as well as security issues related to implementation of the protocol and deployment of such implementations. XEP authors should refer to &rfc3552; for helpful information about documenting security considerations and should also confer with the XMPP Extensions Editor and/or XMPP Council regarding this important task.</p>
</section1>
<section1 topic='IANA Considerations' anchor='iana'>
<p>Some XMPP Extension Protocols may require interaction with &IANA;. The IANA acts as a clearinghouse to assign and coordinate the use of numerous Internet protocol parameters, such as MIME types and port numbers (e.g., the TCP ports 5222, 5269, and 5280 used by the XMPP developer community are registered with the IANA). Whether or not a XEP requires registration of parameters with the IANA, that fact must be noted and explained in a distinct section of the XEP entitled "IANA Considerations". Registration with the IANA must not occur until the registration has been approved by the XMPP Council (e.g., by advancement of a XEP to a status of Draft or Active), and must be initiated by the XMPP Registrar in consultation with the XEP author, not by the XEP author directly with the IANA.</p>
<p>Some XMPP Extension Protocols may require interaction with &IANA;. The IANA acts as a clearinghouse to assign and coordinate the use of numerous Internet protocol parameters, such as MIME types and port numbers (e.g., the TCP ports 5222, 5269, and 5280 used by the XMPP developer community are registered with the IANA). Whether or not a XEP requires registration of parameters with the IANA, that fact must be noted and explained in a distinct section of the XEP entitled "IANA Considerations". Registration with the IANA must not occur until the registration has been approved by the XMPP Council (e.g., by advancement of a XEP to a status of Stable or Active), and must be initiated by the XMPP Registrar in consultation with the XEP author, not by the XEP author directly with the IANA.</p>
</section1>
<section1 topic='XMPP Registrar Considerations' anchor='registrar'>
<p>The &REGISTRAR; performs a function similar to the IANA, although limited to the XMPP developer community. It does so by reserving protocol namespaces and by uniquely assigning parameters for use in the context of XMPP protocols (for example, the categories and types used in &xep0030;).</p>
<p>Whether or not a XEP requires registration of protocol namespaces or parameters with the XMPP Registrar, that fact must be noted and explained in a distinct section of the XEP entitled "XMPP Registrar Considerations". Such registration should not occur until a XEP advances to a status of Draft (Standards Track XEPs) or Active (Informational and Historical XEPs). Registration of protocol namespaces is initiated by the XMPP Extensions Editor when a XEP advances to Draft or Active. Registration of particular parameters used within a specification may be initiated by a XEP author within the text of the XEP, or by an implementor of the XEP after it has advanced to Draft or Active. For details regarding the XMPP Registrar and its processes, refer to <cite>XEP-0053</cite>.</p>
<p>Whether or not a XEP requires registration of protocol namespaces or parameters with the XMPP Registrar, that fact must be noted and explained in a distinct section of the XEP entitled "XMPP Registrar Considerations". Such registration should not occur until a XEP advances to a status of Stable (Standards Track XEPs) or Active (Informational and Historical XEPs). Registration of protocol namespaces is initiated by the XMPP Extensions Editor when a XEP advances to Stable or Active. Registration of particular parameters used within a specification may be initiated by a XEP author within the text of the XEP, or by an implementor of the XEP after it has advanced to Stable or Active. For details regarding the XMPP Registrar and its processes, refer to <cite>XEP-0053</cite>.</p>
<p>A XEP may also request that a new registry is to be created by the XMPP Registrar. The XEP author must clearly define the nature of the new registry as well as the process for submitting data to the registry, and should do so in collaboration with the Registrar.</p>
</section1>
<section1 topic='XML Schema' anchor='schema'>

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